Academic Calendar 2021-2022

Academic Regulations

These regulations state the requirements to be met and the procedures to be followed for the awarding of degrees, diplomas, and certificates in the Faculty of Arts and Science. All requests for exceptions to the regulations should be made to the appropriate reviewing body (see Appeal of Academic Decisions). Enquiries concerning Faculty regulations should be made to the Faculty of Arts and Science Faculty Office.

Faculty Regulations are regularly reviewed and are subject to change at any time. This site indicates the academic regulations currently in effect.

In all regulations that refer to decisions made by the instructor, the instructor may choose to delegate responsibility for those decisions as appropriate.

The following is a summary of the Academic Regulations with references to University Policies:

Academic Regulation 1: Academic Integrity

1.1 – Introduction

1.1.1 – Definition

According to the International Centre for Academic Integrity, academic integrity may be defined “as a commitment, even in the face of adversity, to five fundamental values: honesty, trust, fairness, respect, and responsibility, and the quality of courage. From these values flow principles of behaviour that enable academic communities to translate ideals into action.” The Senate Report on Principles and Priorities notes that the educational mission of Queen’s with its emphasis on “intellectual integrity”, “freedom of inquiry and exchange of ideas” and “equal dignity of all persons” depends on an adherence to academic integrity in all its actions. In support of the concept academic integrity, students have the responsibility to familiarize themselves with the rules and regulations of the Faculty. Additional information for instructors and students and direction for appeals can be found throughout this regulation.

In accordance with the Senate Academic Integrity Policy, “adherence to the values expressed through academic integrity forms a foundation for the ‘freedom of inquiry and exchange of ideas’ essential to the intellectual life of the University”. As a member of the International Centre for Academic Integrity (ICAI), Queen’s subscribes to its definition of academic integrity. In “The Fundamental Values of Academic Integrity (2nd Edition)”, the ICAI offers the following statements contextualizing these values:

  1. Honesty Academic communities of integrity advance the quest for truth and knowledge through intellectual and personal honesty in learning, teaching, research, and service.
  2. Trust Academic communities of integrity both foster and rely upon climates of mutual trust. Climates of trust encourage and support the free exchange of ideas, which in turn allows scholarly inquiry to reach its fullest potential.
  3. Fairness Academic communities of integrity establish clear and transparent expectations, standards and practices to support fairness in the interactions of students, faculty, and administrators.
  4. Respect Academic communities of integrity value the interactive, cooperative, participatory nature of learning. They honour, value and consider diverse opinions and ideas.
  5. Responsibility Academic communities of integrity rest upon foundations of personal accountability coupled with the willingness of individuals and groups to lead by example, uphold mutually agreed-upon standards, and take action when they encounter wrongdoing.
  6. Courage To develop and sustain communities of integrity, it takes more than simply believing in the fundamental values. Translating the values from talking points into action – standing up for them in the face of pressure and adversity – requires determination, commitment and courage.

The values set out in this definition are described more fully in a document produced by the ICAI titled “The Fundamental Values of Academic Integrity, Second Edition” and faculty, students and staff are encouraged to consult this document for a more detailed discussion.

1.1.2 – Integrity in Action

The Faculty of Arts and Science at Queen’s is dedicated to creating a scholarly community free to explore a range of ideas, to build and advance knowledge and to share the ideas and knowledge that emerges from a range of intellectual pursuits. Each value gives rise to and supports the next. Honesty appears in presenting one’s own work, whether in the context of an examination, written assignment, laboratory or seminar presentation. It is in researching one’s own work for course assignments. It is also present in faithfully reporting laboratory results even when they do not conform to an original hypothesis. Further, honesty is present in acknowledging dependence on the ideas or words of another and in distinguishing one’s own ideas and thoughts from other sources. Trust exists in an environment where one’s own ideas can be expressed without fear of ridicule or fear that someone else will take credit for them. Fairness appears in the proper and full acknowledgement of contributions of collaborators in group projects and in the full participation of partners in collaborative projects. Respect, in a general sense, is part of an intellectual community which “recognizes the participatory nature of the learning process and honours and respects a wide range of opinions and ideas.” However, “respect” appears in a very particular sense when students attend class, pay attention, contribute to discussion and turn papers in on time; instructors “show respect by taking students’ ideas seriously, providing full and honest feedback on their work” (“The Fundamental Values of Academic Integrity”, p. 8). Ultimately, “responsibility” is both personal and collective and draws students, faculty administrators and staff into creating and maintaining a learning environment supported by and supporting academic integrity. Courage “differs from the preceding values in that it is less a value than a quality or capacity – the capacity to act in accordance with one’s values despite fear” (“The Fundamental Values of Academic Integrity”, p. 12). Courage is displayed by students who make choices and integrous decisions that are followed with action, even in the face of peer pressure to cheat, copy another’s material, provide their own work to others to facilitate cheating, or otherwise represent themselves dishonestly. Students also display courage by acknowledging prior wrongdoing and taking proactive measures to rectify any associated negative impact. As the document further shows, these values are not just abstract but are expressed in and reinforced by policies and practices.

1.2 – Departures from Academic Integrity

In accordance with the Senate Academic Integrity Policy, any departure from these values compromises the “free enquiry and the free expression of ideas, both of which are basic to the University’s central purpose”. The types of departures from academic integrity include, but are not limited to, the following.

1.2.1 – Types of Departures

  1. Plagiarism (presenting another’s ideas or phrasings as one’s own without proper acknowledgement)
    Examples: copying and pasting from the internet, a printed source, or other resource without proper acknowledgement; copying from another student; using direct quotations or large sections of paraphrased material in an assignment without appropriate acknowledgement; submitting the same piece of work in more than one course without the permission of the instructor(s).
  2. Use of Unauthorized Materials
    Examples: possessing or using unauthorized study materials or aids during a test; copying from another’s test paper; using unauthorized calculator or other aids during a test; unauthorized removal of materials from the library, or deliberate concealment of library materials.
  3. Facilitation (enabling another’s breach of academic integrity)
    Examples: making information available to another student; knowingly allowing one’s essay or assignment to be copied by someone else; buying or selling of term papers or assignments and submitting them as one’s own for the purpose of plagiarism.
  4. Forgery (submitting counterfeit documents or statements)
    Example: creating a transcript or other official document.
  5. Falsification (misrepresentation of one’s self, one’s work or one’s relation to the University)
    Examples: altering transcripts or other official documents relating to student records; impersonating someone in an examination or test; submitting a take-home examination written, in whole or in part, by someone else; fabricating or falsifying laboratory or research data.
  6. Intellectual Property Use of intellectual property of others for sale or profit or distribution for unfair academic, personal or professional advantage without the authorization of the owner of the material.
    Examples: student uploading course materials to note sharing websites without instructor’s permission; student providing course materials to commercial study prep services that have not been sanctioned by the University.

1.3 – Remedies or Sanctions for Departures from Academic Integrity

1.3.1 – Remedies or Sanctions an Instructor May Assign

The instructor may consider a range of remedies or sanctions including, but not limited to, the following:

  1. an oral or written warning that such infractions constitute unacceptable behaviour;
  2. a learning experience involving a rewriting or revision of the original piece of work;
  3. the submission of a new piece of work;
  4. the completion of other work;
  5. the deduction of partial or total loss of marks for the assignment/exam; or
  6. a failing grade (down to a grade of zero) in the class.

If the penalty amounts to a failure in the class, the student may not drop the class, regardless of the drop deadlines.

If the instructor believes that the finding warrants a sanction more serious than an instructor may impose, the instructor will refer the case to the Associate Dean (Academic) (see Academic Regulation 1.4.2).

1.3.2 – Remedies or Sanctions the Associate Dean (Academic) May Assign or Recommend

If there is a finding of a departure from academic integrity or a finding of a failure to abide by academic rules, a range of remedies or sanctions including, but not limited to, one or more of the following may be assessed by the Associate Dean (Academic):

  1. an oral or written warning;
  2. a learning experience involving a rewriting or revision of the original piece of work;
  3. the submission of a revised or new piece of work;
  4. partial or total loss of marks for the assignment/examination;
  5. partial or total loss of marks for the course in which the departure of academic integrity took place;
  6. an official written warning that the penalty for a subsequent offence could be a requirement to withdraw from the Faculty or University for a specified minimum period of time;
  7. the rescinding of University- or Faculty-awarded scholarships, prizes and/or bursaries;
  8. a requirement to withdraw from the Faculty for a specified minimum period of time;
  9. a recommendation to withdraw from the University for a specified minimum period of time; or
  10. a recommendation for the revocation or rescinding of a degree.

No student who has been required to withdraw due to a departure from academic integrity may apply to graduate during the period of the sanction.

1.3.3 – Factors to Consider in Assigning a Sanction

Factors that should be considered in assigning a remedy or sanction include:

  1. The extent and seriousness of the departure having regard to its actual or potential consequences;
  2. the degree to which the work or conduct in question forms a significant portion of the final grade and whether the extent of the departure is substantial as demonstrated by the work or conduct in question;
  3. the academic experience of the student differentiating between first-year or students taking electives and upper-year students who ought to be familiar with the expectations for academic integrity in the discipline, Department and/or Faculty;
  4. records of multiple departures within a single incident or multiple departures discovered at one time, rather than an isolated aberration;
  5. evidence of a deliberate attempt to gain advantage;
  6. injury to another student or to the institution; or
  7. conduct that intimidates others or provoked the misconduct by others.

Mitigating circumstances do not exonerate or excuse from the finding of a departure from academic integrity, but these factors may be taken into account to ensure that the imposed sanction is fair, reasonable and proportionate to the gravity of the departure found. The decision must outline the evidence supporting reliance on the mitigating circumstances. The onus is on the student to adduce evidence of mitigating circumstances, which may include:

  1. documented evidence from an appropriate health professional of factors directly compromising the student’s capacity to adhere to the standards of academic integrity at the relevant time;
  2. prompt admission to the departure from academic integrity by the student and expression of contrition and willingness to undertake educative remedies; or
  3. evidence that reasonable steps were not taken in the circumstances to bring the standards and expectations regarding academic integrity to the attention of the student at the relevant time.

In summary, any sanction should reflect the extent and severity of the departure from academic integrity, and precedents in the academic unit and Faculty, taking into account any mitigating circumstances.

1.3.4 – Categorizing the Finding

In preparing the finding and corresponding sanction, decision makers must also distinguish between “minor” (Level I) and “major” (Level II) departures.

In preparing the finding, decision makers should use the guidelines below to categorize the departure as being either Level I or Level II. Only one factor need apply to establish a Level II departure. Because instructors are generally the most familiar with the case and the surrounding circumstances, instructors are expected to use informed judgment and reasonable discretion in deciding on a Level I versus a Level II departure. Instructors may also seek general advice on categorizing the remedy or sanction from the Faculty Office.

1.3.4.1 – Level I Departures

Level I departures will not be kept in a student’s main file, but in a separate special file that will only be accessed if there is a future finding. Central to the separation of a finding from the student’s main file is an attempt to find a balance between remediation and sanction. Whereas sanctions are necessary where there are findings of departures from academic integrity, this policy avoids treating students punitively in all cases and allows for remedies which seek to educate students about matters related to academic integrity. Level I materials are destroyed as of the date of the student’s graduation.

A Level I departure will be assessed under the following conditions:

  1. the extent or severity of the departure is limited;
  2. the departure is on an assignment where the sanction is less than 50 per cent of the course grade and the sanction will NOT necessarily result in a failure in a course;
  3. the student is at an early stage of his/her academic career, especially a Year 1 student, or the student has little or no experience in a course in a particular subject (for example first-time experience in a History or Psychology Department);
  4. there is no direct evidence of a deliberate attempt to gain advantage; or
  5. there is no direct effect on other student(s) or the institution.
1.3.4.2 – Level II Departures

Level II departures will be kept in the student’s main file in the Faculty Office. This file is kept confidential and is used for academic advising purposes. It will also be consulted where a finding has been copied to the Office of the Associate Dean (Academic). In rare cases, some institutions (such as American Law Schools, Medical Schools and Police Academies) request references from the Associate Dean (Academic) and the materials in the file are consulted to answer specific questions about the student’s academic history.

A Level II departure will be assessed under the following conditions (only one factor need apply):

  1. the extent and severity of the departure is significant (e.g., in the case of plagiarism, the departure involves significant and unacknowledged use of one or more sources);
  2. the sanction WILL result in a failure in a course;
  3. the departure is by an upper-year student who has taken several previous courses in the subject (for instance, a fourth-year student);
  4. there are previous departures from academic integrity (the case should therefore be referred to the Associate Dean);
  5. there is evidence of additional misconduct involving forgery, facilitation, etc.; or
  6. there is a direct negative effect on other students (e.g. stealing another students’ paper, assignment, laboratory work) or the institution.

Because instructors are generally the most familiar with the case and the surrounding circumstances, instructors are expected to use informed judgment and reasonable discretion in deciding on a Level II departure.

Under current practices in the Faculty, one Level I departure results in no further action; two Level I findings result in a review of the cases by the Associate Dean (Academic) and a letter of warning which is kept in the student’s main file; and three instances of a Level I finding result in an investigation to determine if a requirement to withdraw should be recommended to the Senate Committee on Academic Procedures (SCAP). These current practices may vary depending on the seriousness of each individual departure.

1.3.5 – Appeals

A student may not appeal any of the following to the Associate Dean (Academic) for a class in which any finding of a departure from academic integrity has been assessed:

  1. To drop the class after the last official date for dropping classes (see Academic Calendar Dates);
  2. To request Aegrotat standing in the class (see Academic Regulation 10); or
  3. To request Credit (CR) standing in the class (see Academic Regulation 10).

1.4 – Processes for Investigation of Departures from Academic Integrity

1.4.1 – Investigation by an Instructor of Suspected Departures from Academic Integrity in a Class

1.4.1.1 – Delegation of Investigation

Normally the instructor of the class is the individual tasked with the investigation of a possible departure from academic integrity. However, in cases where the instructor is unable to initiate and/or complete the investigation, the Department Head may delegate the responsibility to another individual within the Department.

1.4.1.2 – Collection of Initial Information

To begin investigating a possible departure from academic integrity, the instructor should assemble all documents related to the case. Such documents might include:

  1. the work submitted by the student for academic credit;
  2. the source(s) from which the work submitted by the student is apparently derived;
  3. the instructions describing the nature of the work to be done;
  4. any e-mail between the instructor and the student relating to the work;
  5. any other materials related to the departure; or
  6. any documents used by the instructor or his or her department stating policies on departures from academic integrity.

While collecting evidence, the instructor is encouraged to seek guidance from the Undergraduate Chair, Head, or appropriate department delegate concerning matters relating to departures from academic integrity, and from the University Ombudsman concerning university policy and procedure.

When discussing possible departures from academic integrity, the instructor should ensure that the student’s identity remains confidential, pending a finding of departure from academic integrity.

Should the instructor decide the evidence is insufficient to proceed with further investigation, all documents related to the matter should be destroyed and all aspects of the case considered dismissed.

Should the instructor decide the evidence merits further investigation, he or she should continue the processes outlined below.

1.4.1.3 – Notification of Investigation

Where possible departures from academic integrity within a course are identified, the instructor must advise the student in writing. Instructors are encouraged to use the Notice of Investigation form. Completing the form supplies the student with the information required by Senate Policy, including:

  1. the evidence on which the investigation is based; the possible remedies or sanctions;
  2. the student’s right to respond to the investigation; and
  3. the student’s right to have representation for any response – the instructor will inform the student of the services provided by the University Ombudsman.

 While the case is under investigation, the instructor should address all matters to the student as “possible” or “apparent” departures from academic integrity. The instructor should include all documents relevant to the investigation (i.e., those gathered under Academic Regulation 1.4.1.2 above) along with the Notice of Investigation form.

1.4.1.3.1 – Delivery and Receipt of Documentation

To ensure that students receive the Notice and additional relevant materials in a timely manner, instructors should e- mail the students with the direction to pick up the materials from the program’s departmental office or send these documents via password-protected e-mail to the students’ Queen’s e-mail account.

Within 7 days of receiving the notice of investigation, the student must make an initial response to the instructor, either to schedule a meeting or to indicate that he/she does not wish to meet and will provide a written response.

1.4.1.3.2 – Student’s Enrolment Status

The student may not drop the class once a notice of investigation has been delivered. If an instructor becomes aware that a student under investigation has dropped the class, the instructor should alert the Associate Dean (Academic), who will reinstate the student pending the outcome of the case. Otherwise, if a finding is made, the Faculty Office will confirm the student’s enrolment status in the class when filing the finding, and reinstate the student at that time, if necessary.

1.4.1.3.3 – Submission of a Final Grade

If an investigation is initiated near the end of the class or otherwise cannot be resolved prior to the grade submission deadline, the instructor should assign a Grade Deferred (GD) to hold the final grade in abeyance until the investigation process has been concluded. Once the investigation is concluded, the instructor must submit a change of grade.

1.4.1.3.4 – Graduation

No student who is the subject of an ongoing academic integrity investigation may graduate, even if academic credit for the course(s) under investigation is not required to complete a degree. The Faculty will make all reasonable attempts to expedite the investigation process before the expected convocation date.

1.4.1.4 – Investigation and Meeting
1.4.1.4.1 – Convening the Meeting

In most instances, the instructor will convene a meeting with the student (and his or her representative), the instructor (and his or her representative), and witnesses where appropriate, to conduct a thorough review of the evidence. Where it is decided a meeting will occur, the instructor and the student will set a mutually agreed-upon time and the instructor will notify the student of the time and location of the meeting, the right to bring a representative, and the names of those who will be present.

1.4.1.4.2 – Student’s Alternative to Attending a Meeting

If, for any reason, the student does not wish to meet in person, he or she may submit a detailed, written explanation to the instructor, along with copies of earlier drafts of the student’s work, and any other relevant documentation. This written submission must be provided to the instructor within 10 days of receipt of the Notice of Investigation.

1.4.1.4.3 – Student’s Right to Review Documentation

At least 10 calendar days prior to the meeting, the student has the right to see any relevant material considered by the instructor in addition to the documents sent with the Notice of Investigation (see Academic Regulation 1.4.1.3).

1.4.1.5 – Deciding on a Finding
1.4.1.5.1 – No Grounds Found for a Finding

If, after an investigation of the evidence and consideration of the response by the student, the instructor determines that there are no grounds for a finding, all documents related to the case will be destroyed and the student will be informed that the investigation has been dismissed.

1.4.1.5.2 – Grounds Found for a Finding

If, after an investigation of the evidence and consideration of the response by the student, the instructor determines that there is sufficient and persuasive evidence on which to make a finding of departure from academic integrity, the instructor must then proceed to establish an appropriate remedy.

1.4.1.6 – Assessing a Sanction after a Finding is Determined
1.4.1.6.1 – Contacting the Faculty Office

After making a finding, the instructor should then contact the Faculty Office. If a previous finding is on record, the instructor will refer the case to the Associate Dean (Academic) who will set an appropriate sanction (see Academic Regulation 1.4.2.3). A record of a previous departure from academic integrity is only relevant when assessing an appropriate sanction or remedy; it should have no bearing on the determination of a finding. (See Academic Regulation 1.4.2 for the process followed by the Associate Dean (Academic) in assessing a sanction after referral from an instructor.)

1.4.1.6.2 – Referral to the Associate Dean (Academic)

If the finding appears to warrant a sanction more serious that the instructor may impose, the case shall be referred to the Associate Dean (Academic). The instructor should fill out a Finding of a Departure from Academic Integrity form, indicating that there has been a finding but that the case will be referred to the Associate Dean (Academic) for consideration of a sanction. A copy should be directed to the student either by e-mailing the student requesting that he or she picks up a copy from the instructor’s departmental office or by sending the document by registered mail. A copy should also be sent to the Associate Dean (Academic). (See Academic Regulation 1.4.2 for the process followed by the Associate Dean (Academic) in assessing a sanction after referral from an instructor.)

1.4.1.6.3 – Sanction and Level Determined by the Instructor

If there is no previous finding on record or if the instructor decides that one of the penalties outlined in Academic Regulation 1.3.1 is appropriate, then he or she will determine a remedy or sanction appropriate to the extent or severity of the offence, and may consult with the Department for guidance on an appropriate remedy or sanction.

The instructor should also determine whether the particular finding should be categorized as a Level I or Level II departure according to the guidelines in Academic Regulation 1.3.4.

1.4.1.7 – Notification of Decision

After making the finding, setting a remedy or sanction within the scope of those available to the instructor (see Academic Regulation 1.3.1), and categorizing the departure as Level I or Level II, the instructor must inform the student in writing of the decision. Instructors are encouraged to use the Finding of a Departure from Academic Integrity form. Completing the form supplies the student with the information required by Senate Policy, including:

  1. the details of the finding of departure from academic integrity, including the reasons for the finding as supported by relevant, clear and cogent evidence;
  2. the remedy or sanction;
  3. the type of departure (Level I or Level II)
  4. the student’s right to appeal the finding and/or the remedy or sanction to the Associate Dean (Academic) (see Appeal of Academic Decisions, Section 2);
  5. the deadline for appealing to the Associate Dean (Academic);
  6. the resources available for consultation (the instructor will inform the student of the services provided by the University Ombudsman); and
  7. the fact that a copy of the finding will be kept on file in the Office of the Associate Dean (Academic).

In the case of a student who is studying at Queen’s University on an official exchange program or as a visiting student on a Letter of Permission, a copy of the finding of a departure from academic integrity must be reported in writing to the student’s home university Faculty or Program Office.

In the case of an Arts and Science student who is registered in a collaborative degree program offered jointly with another post-secondary institution, a copy of the finding of a departure from academic integrity must be reported in writing to the partner institution (see Academic Regulation 18.5.1).

Information on the process of appealing an instructor’s decision to the Associate Dean (Academic) is outlined in Appeal of Academic Decisions, Section 2.

1.4.2 – Assessment of Sanction by the Associate Dean (Academic) Upon Referral from an Instructor

If the finding made by the instructor appears to warrant a sanction more serious than the instructor may impose or if there is a previous finding of departure from academic integrity on file in the Faculty Office (see Academic Regulation 1.3.4.2), the instructor must refer the case to the Associate Dean (Academic) who will impose an appropriate sanction. The Associate Dean (Academic) may impose sanctions ranging from those listed in Academic
 
Regulation 1.3.2 to a recommendation to the Senate Committee on Academic Procedures (SCAP) that the student be required to withdraw from the University.

1.4.2.1 – Notification of Referral

In referring the sanction for a finding of a departure from academic integrity to the Associate Dean (Academic), the instructor must advise the student in writing. Instructors are encouraged to use the Finding of a Departure from Academic Integrity form, indicating that there has been a finding but that the case will be referred to the Associate Dean (Academic) for consideration of a sanction. Completing the form supplies the student with the information required by Senate policy, including:

  1. the details of the finding of departure from academic integrity, including the reasons for the finding as supported by relevant, clear and cogent evidence;
  2. the fact that the case is being referred to the Associate Dean (Academic) for assessment of an appropriate sanction;
  3. the student’s right to appeal the finding and/or the remedy or sanction to the Associate Dean (Academic) (see Appeal of Academic Decisions, Section 2);
  4. the resources available for consultation (the instructor will inform the student of the services provided by the University Ombudsman); and
  5. the fact that a copy of the finding will be kept on file in the Office of the Associate Dean (Academic).

The instructor should also include all documents relevant to the investigation and finding with a copy sent to the Associate Dean (Academic).

To ensure that students receive the finding and additional relevant materials in a timely manner, instructors should e-mail the students with the direction to pick up the materials from the academic unit’s main administrative office or send these documents via password-protected e-mail to the students’ Queen’s e-mail account.

Within 7 days of receiving the notice of investigation, the student must make an initial response to the Associate Dean (Academic), either to schedule a meeting or to indicate that he/she does not wish to meet and will provide a written response.

1.4.2.2 – Investigation and Meeting
1.4.2.2.1 – Convening the Meeting

In most instances, the Associate Dean (Academic) will convene a meeting with the student (and his or her representative), the instructor (and his or her representative), and witnesses where appropriate, to conduct a thorough review of the evidence as it relates to assessing an appropriate sanction (as outlined under Academic Regulation 1.3.3). This review will allow the Associate Dean (Academic) to weigh the mitigating and aggravating circumstances (as outlined in Academic Regulation 1.3.3) to arrive at an appropriate sanction. Where it is decided a meeting will occur, the Associate Dean (Academic) will notify the student and the instructor of the time and location of the meeting. The student will also be informed of the right to bring a representative and the names of those who will be present. In preparation for the meeting, the Associate Dean (Academic) may request additional relevant materials.

1.4.2.2.2 – Student’s Alternative to Attending a Meeting

If, for any reason, the student does not wish to meet in person, he or she may submit a detailed, written explanation to the instructor, along with copies of earlier drafts of the student’s work, and any other relevant documentation. This written submission must be provided to the instructor within 7 days of receipt of the notice of investigation.

1.4.2.2.3 – Student’s Right to Review Documentation

At least 7 calendar days prior to the meeting, the student has the right to see any relevant material considered by the Associate Dean (Academic) in addition to the documents sent with the Finding (see Academic Regulation 1.4.1.3).

1.4.2.3 – Assessing a Sanction

After a review of the evidence and consideration of the response by the student, the Associate Dean (Academic) will inform the student of the appropriate sanction or remedy according to the guidelines in Academic Regulation 1.3.2, categorize the sanction as Level I or Level II, and inform the student and the instructor in writing of the following:

  1. the remedies or the sanctions and reasons for them;
  2. the type of departure (Level I or Level II);
  3. the student’s right to appeal the finding and/or the remedy or sanction to the Academic Integrity and Conduct Panel (see Appeal of Academic Decisions, Section 2);
  4. the deadline for appealing to the Academic Integrity and Conduct Panel;
  5. the resources available for consultation (the Associate Dean (Academic) will inform the student of the services provided by the University Ombudsman); and
  6. the fact that, in the case of a Level II finding, a copy of the finding will be kept on file in the Office of the Associate Dean (Academic).

Appeals of the decisions of the Associate Dean (Academic) may be made to the Faculty of Arts and Science Academic Integrity and Conduct Panel as outlined in Appeal of Academic Decisions, Section 2.

1.4.3 – Investigation of Suspected Departures from Academic Integrity by the Associate Dean (Academic)

Where possible departures from academic integrity are identified that involve more than one course, multiple instances, or the possibility of forgery or falsification (see Academic Regulation 1.3.3), the Associate Dean (Academic) may initiate an investigation. In addition, an instructor may request (in writing) that the Associate Dean (Academic) conduct an investigation on his or her behalf when such serious departures are suspected. The Associate Dean (Academic) may also undertake an investigation of a departure from academic integrity in academic matters unrelated to performance in a course.

1.4.3.1 – Preliminary Investigation: Collection of Initial Information

To begin investigating a possible departure from academic integrity, the Associate Dean (Academic) should assemble all documents related to the case. Such documents might include:

  1. the work submitted by the student for academic credit;
  2. the source(s) from which the work submitted by the student is apparently derived;
  3. the instructions describing the nature of the work to be done;
  4. any e-mail between the instructor and the student relating to the work;
  5. any other materials related to the departure;
  6. any documents used by the instructor or his or her department stating policies on departures from academic integrity.

While collecting evidence, the Associate Dean (Academic) is encouraged to seek guidance from the Undergraduate Chair, Head, or appropriate department delegate concerning matters relating to departures from academic integrity, and from the University Ombudsman concerning University policy and procedure.

When discussing possible departures from academic integrity, the Associate Dean (Academic) should ensure that the student’s identity remains confidential, pending a finding of departure from academic integrity.

Should the Associate Dean (Academic) decide the evidence is insufficient to proceed with further investigation, all documents related to the matter should be destroyed and all aspects of the case considered dismissed.

Should the Associate Dean (Academic) decide the evidence merits further investigation, he or she should continue the processes outlined below.

1.4.3.2 – Notice of Investigation of Departure from Academic Integrity

The Associate Dean (Academic) must advise the student in writing of the following:

  1. the evidence on which the investigation is based;
  2. the student’s right to respond to the investigation; and
  3. the student’s right to have representation for any response; the Associate Dean (Academic) will inform the student of the services provided by the University Ombudsman.

The Associate Dean (Academic) should also include all documents relevant to the investigation and finding.

1.4.3.2.1 – Delivery and Receipt of Documentation

To ensure that students receive the Notice of Investigation and additional relevant materials in a timely manner, the Office of the Associate Dean (Academic) should e-mail the students with the direction to pick up the materials from the Student Services Office or send these documents via password-protected e-mail to the students’ Queen’s e-mail account.
 
Within 7 days of receiving the notice of investigation, the student must make an initial response to the Associate Dean (Academic), either to schedule a meeting or to indicate that he or she does not wish to meet and will provide a written response.

1.4.3.3 – Investigation and Meeting
1.4.3.3.1 – Convening the Meeting

In most instances, the Associate Dean (Academic) will convene a meeting with the student (and his or her representative), the instructor (and his or her representative), and witnesses where appropriate, to conduct a thorough review of the evidence as it relates to the departure. Where it is decided a meeting will occur, the Associate Dean (Academic) will notify the student and the instructor of the time and location of the meeting. The student will also be informed of the right to bring a representative and the names of those who will be present. In preparation for the meeting, the Associate Dean (Academic) may request additional relevant materials.

1.4.3.3.2 – Student’s Alternative to Attending a Meeting

If, for any reason, the student does not wish to meet in person, he or she may submit a detailed, written explanation to the Associate Dean (Academic), along with copies of earlier drafts of the student’s work, and any other relevant documentation. This written submission must be provided to the instructor within 7 days of receipt of the notice of investigation.

1.4.3.3.3 – Student’s Right to Review Documentation

At least 7 calendar days prior to the meeting, the student has the right to see any relevant material considered by the Associate Dean (Academic) since issuing the Notice of Investigation, in addition to the documents sent with the Notice of Investigation (see Academic Regulation 1.4.3.2).

1.4.3.4 – Finding of Departure from Academic Integrity
1.4.3.4.1 – No Grounds Found for a Finding

If, after an investigation of the evidence and consideration of the response by the student, the Associate Dean (Academic) determines that there are no grounds for a finding, all documents related to the case will be destroyed and the student will be informed that the investigation has been dropped.

1.4.3.4.2 – Grounds Found for a Finding

If, after an investigation of the evidence and consideration of the response by the student, the Associate Dean (Academic) determines that there is sufficient and persuasive evidence on which to make a finding of departure from academic integrity, the Associate Dean (Academic) must set an appropriate remedy or sanction and then notify the student in writing.

1.4.3.5 – Assessing a Sanction after a Finding is Determined

The Associate Dean (Academic) will consider the factors discussed in Academic Regulation 1.3.3 in setting a sanction. The sanction should reflect the extent and severity of the departure from academic integrity, and precedents in the Faculty, taking into account any mitigating circumstances.

After making the finding and setting the corresponding sanction, the Associate Dean (Academic) will categorize the departure as being either Level I or Level II as outlined in Academic Regulation 1.3.4.

1.4.3.6 – Notification of Decision

After making the finding, setting a remedy or sanction and categorizing the departure as Level I or Level II, the Associate Dean (Academic) must inform the student of the following:

  1. the details of the finding of departure from academic integrity, including the reasons for the finding as supported by relevant, clear and cogent evidence;
  2. the remedy or sanction;
  3. the type of departure (Level I or Level II);
  4. the student’s right to appeal the finding and/or the sanction to the Academic Integrity and Conduct Panel (see Appeal of Academic Decisions, Section 2);
  5. the deadline for appealing to the Academic Integrity and Conduct Panel;
  6. the resources available for consultation; the Associate Dean (Academic) will inform the student of the services provided by the University Ombudsman; and
  7. the fact that, in the case of a Level II finding, a copy of the finding will be kept on file in the Office of the Associate Dean (Academic).

In the case of a student who is studying at Queen’s University on an official exchange program or as a visiting student on a Letter of Permission, a copy of the finding of a departure from academic integrity must be reported in writing to the student’s home university Faculty or Program Office.

In the case of an Arts and Science student who is registered in a collaborative degree program offered jointly with another post-secondary institution, a copy of the finding of a departure from academic integrity must be reported in writing to the partner institution (see Academic Regulation 18.5.1).

Appeals of the decisions of the Associate Dean (Academic) may be made to the Faculty of Arts and Science Academic Integrity and Conduct Panel as outlined in Appeal of Academic Decisions, Section 2.

1.5 – Failure to Abide by Academic Rules

Students must abide by all Faculty and University academic rules, including rules imposed by course instructors, or others (for example, teaching assistants, guest or substitute instructors), regarding the preparation, writing, and submission of assignments, or the writing of tests and examinations. Students must also abide by other University- wide academic regulations, such as those governing ethics reviews. For remedies or sanctions that can be assessed and procedures to be followed if a student fails to abide by academic rules, see Regulations 1.3 and 1.4.

Academic Regulation 2: Enrolment and Registration Priorities

2.1 – Career

All students admitted to the Faculty of Arts and Science will be registered in either an Undergraduate or Undergraduate Online Career. The Undergraduate Online Career is primarily intended for those students who are taking courses only online. The Undergraduate Career is primarily intended for those students studying on campus.

All courses in Arts and Science shall be offered through one of the Undergraduate or Undergraduate Online Careers. Students in an Undergraduate Online Career may only enrol in online courses, and may be given priority access to these courses. Students in an Undergraduate Career may enrol in courses offered through either Career.

Students may transfer from the Undergraduate Online Career to the Undergraduate Career as determined in Admission Regulation 5.4. At a minimum, a student must have completed 24.0 units and have a minimum cumulative GPA of 1.60 to transfer to on-campus studies.

2.2 – Students at Level 1 (Fewer than 24.0 Units Completed)

2.2.1 – Programs and Plans for Level 1 Students

Most students entering Level 1 of study will be registered in a degree program, but not a specific Plan.

Those students entering the Faculty of Arts and Science in one of the following three specialized degree programs

  1. Bachelor of Fine Art (Honours);
  2. Bachelor of Music; or
  3. Bachelor of Science (Honours), Specialization in Kinesiology will be registered in the appropriate Plan upon admission.

Upon entering Level 1, students may select from any of the courses available to first-year students that are offered in the Faculty of Arts and Science subject to the following limitations:

  1. Those courses in which, in order to enrol, students must demonstrate a suitable level of competency through a placement test, audition or interview with the department or the course instructor.
  2. Those courses in which, in order to enrol, students must have completed the necessary secondary school (or equivalent) prerequisite requirements.
  3. Those courses reserved for students registered in one of the four specialized degree programs noted above.
  4. High-demand Arts courses, in which enrolment priority will be given to those admitted as Arts students; similarly, high-demand Science courses, in which enrolment priority will be given to those admitted as Science students. Such courses will normally be announced in early June of each year.
    Note: During the open enrolment period, most enrolment limitations of this nature are removed and any available spots in high-demand courses become available to all Arts and Science students, provided that any other existing prerequisite requirements are satisfied.
  5. Online courses, in which enrolment priority will be given to those students admitted to the Undergraduate Online Career and to upper-year on-campus students to provide them with flexibility and choice. It is recommended that first-year on-campus students take part in the classroom experience to help with the transition from high school, rather than enrolling in online courses.

2.3 – Students Entering Level 2 (24.0 to Fewer than 48.0 Units Completed)

2.3.1 – Application for Programs and Plans

All students, other than those in the three specialized Degree Programs noted in Academic Regulation 2.1.1, who anticipate entering Level 2 following the completion of Winter Term, must apply for access to a specific program and Plan(s). The Program/Plan selection period will normally take place during two weeks in May of each year, following release of the Winter Term final grades.

2.3.2 – Academic Thresholds for Priority and Eligibility of Applicants

In consultation with the Faculty of Arts and Science, departments administering a given Plan are responsible for developing specific academic thresholds for priority and eligibility of students for acceptance in the Plan in question. These thresholds will be formulated taking into account both academic requirements and the number of spaces available in that Plan. The thresholds may vary from year to year based on the predicted size and strength of the applicant pool. The threshold criteria will consist of a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) and/or a minimum grade in a single course. These criteria will normally be published on the Faculty of Arts and Science website by March of each academic year. Two thresholds will be determined for each Plan:

  1. Automatic Acceptance Threshold
    Students whose academic achievements in first year meet or exceed this threshold are considered to be academically qualified for the Plan, and will normally be automatically eligible for acceptance in the Plan.
  2. Pending List Threshold
    Students whose academic achievements in first year meet or exceed the pending list threshold, but fall below the automatic acceptance threshold, are considered to be academically qualified for the Plan. The students’ level of performance is such, however, that in limited-enrolment Plans, or those Plans in which complex academic evaluations take place (usually those Plans administered in partnership with one or more departments), these students will be placed on a pending list until such a time as their academic credentials can be reviewed in detail by the Department administering the Plan.

Students whose academic achievements in first year fall below the pending list threshold are not considered to be academically qualified for the Plan, and will be denied acceptance.

During the Program/Plan selection period, students must choose one Plan for which they meet the automatic acceptance threshold criteria. They shall then be registered in that Plan. In addition, students may select up to one Plan for which they are eligible to be placed on the pending list but are not eligible for automatic acceptance. Following the selection period, departments will review the students on the pending list for each Plan under their administration. Any remaining spaces in that Plan shall be made available to students on the pending list in rank order of academic qualification. The Plans of students who are accepted from the pending list shall be changed from the Plan in which they were originally accepted to the new Plan.

Those students who wish to pursue a Major-Minor Plan combination shall first select a Major Plan for which they are eligible for automatic acceptance or placement on a pending list and then select a Minor Plan in a similar fashion.

Each time a student is accepted into a new Plan, either by his/her own selection or by acceptance by a Department from a pending list, the Plan change will be recorded on the student record and displayed on the official transcript.

2.3.3 – Enrolment Priorities in Plans

While the departments and Faculty of Arts and Science will make every effort to ensure that the automatic acceptance threshold in any Plan is such that the Plan will not be oversubscribed, should it become apparent during the selection period that a particular Plan has become over-enrolled, the Faculty of Arts and Science reserves the right to move those students ranked lowest academically from automatic acceptance to the pending list for that Plan and require said students to choose another Plan for which they meet the automatic acceptance threshold.

2.3.4 – Late Requests for Plans

Students who fail to participate in the Program/Plan selection period or who are admitted after the Program/Plan selection period has finished must make direct application to the department offering their Plan of choice. They will be considered subject to academic criteria and space availability.

2.4 – Students Continuing in Level 2 or Above

Once registered in a program and Plan(s), students may not be removed from that program and Plan(s) unless they successfully request transfer to another program and Plan(s).

Students should note, however, that departments administering a Plan may impose minimum prerequisites to determine academic eligibility for access to some or all of the upper-level courses (those numbered 200 and above, and see Academic Regulation 2.5 below). These prerequisites, however, will be determined such that a student deemed initially acceptable to the Plan, and operating at a similar level of ongoing academic performance, will not be restricted from continuing. Students who fail to meet these prerequisites will effectively be barred from continuing in the program and Plan(s) in which they are enrolled. Such students should seek academic advice from the Department(s) concerned and/or the Office of the Associate Dean (Academic).

2.5 – Change of Programs and Plans

Students wishing to transfer to the Bachelor of Fine Art (Honours) or the Bachelor of Music program must apply through the Faculty Office, Student Services (see Admission Regulation 12.5.1). For all other programs and Plans, upper-year students may request a Plan change during the Program/Plan selection period by applying through the Faculty of Arts and Science website. Departments may set, and publish on their websites, minimum criteria for accepting transfer students at various levels of that Plan. Acceptance into a new Plan will be contingent on there being space within that Plan.

After that time period, late change of Plan requests may be submitted through the Arts and Science website until the start of the class selection period. Late acceptance into a new Plan will be contingent on there being space within that Plan.

2.6 – Access to Classes

2.6.1 – Eligibility to Enrol in Classes

Students, other than those in Level 1, must be enrolled in an approved Plan to gain access to classes and become registered.

Eligibility for registration in all classes rests on course prerequisites, corequisites and exclusions as stated in the Calendar. In special circumstances, departments may waive these requirements. A maximum of 15.0 units in each of the Fall and Winter Terms may be requested during the class selection period.

2.6.2 – Priority to Enrol in Classes

Priority for requested classes is determined by individual departments based on the following three criteria. Exchange students who satisfy the criteria listed below will be granted entry on the same basis as other students. At the discretion of the Department, exchange students may be admitted to classes even if they do not meet these criteria.

2.6.2.1 – Academic Criteria

During the summer class selection period departments may choose to restrict access to certain classes to ensure that priority is given to students in the appropriate Plan. Student access to classes is subject to the following priorities listed in descending order. Priority will be given to students for whom the class is:

  1. Core in their Plan;
  2. An option in their Plan;
  3. Part of their recognized concurrent-education teaching subject;
  4. An elective, or an option in the Plan beyond the normal load.

Within each category, priority will be given to students who have the specified prerequisites and:

  1. Are furthest along in their Plan;
  2. Are not repeating the course.
2.6.2.2 – Number of Spaces Available
The University reserves the right to limit enrolment in any class that becomes oversubscribed.
 
2.6.2.3 – Student Participation in the Official Registration Process

Students requesting classes after the summer class selection period, including those admitted too late to participate in the class selection period, will be considered subject to space availability.

2.7 – Enrolment in Graduate Courses

Arts and Science students may be permitted to take courses offered through the School of Graduate Studies for credit toward their undergraduate degree program under the following conditions:

  1. Enrolment requires the approval of the instructor, the Chair of Undergraduate Studies in their Department of concentration and the School of Graduate Studies;
  2. Permission to enrol is only available to level 4 students (84.0 or more units completed) whom the Department deems to be outstanding (generally taken to mean a cumulative GPA of at least 3.50); and
  3. Except in the case of approved combined Bachelor’s and Master’s programs, the same course(s) may not count for credit in both a graduate and undergraduate degree program in which the student is registered or subsequently registers.

Academic Regulation 3: Number of Units in a Term and Academic Year

3.1 – External Agencies

The primary purpose of this regulation is to define the number of units a student may register in during any term. For this purpose, students are designated as having either Full-Time or Part-Time Registration Status in the Faculty. Full- time or part-time registration status defines a student’s maximum allowed course load and is based solely on academic criteria. Students should note that many external bodies (e.g. OSAP, Revenue Canada, scholarship agencies, or other academic institutions) may have different definitions of full-time or part-time course load for the purposes of grant funding, scholarship eligibility or taxation status. If in doubt of your course load status in regards to such agencies, please contact the Office of the University Registrar, or the external agency directly, as appropriate, for advice.

3.2 – Full-Time Registration Status

3.2.1 – Normal Course Loads for Full-Time Students

Full-time students in most Arts and Science programs normally take a total of 15.0 units in each of the Fall and Winter Terms for a total of 30.0 units over the Fall-Winter period (1 September to 30 April). The normal load for students in the B.Mus., B.A.(Hons.)/B.Ed. and B.Sc.(Hons.)/B.Ed. programs is greater than 30.0 units. Full-time students may choose, at any time, to register in fewer classes, or to drop classes (before the published deadlines), such that they fall below this course load and retain their right to full-time registration status in a future term. However, students must be registered in at least 18.0 units in the Fall-Winter period, with at least 9.0 units in each of the Fall and Winter Terms, in order to be considered to be in a full-time course load.

3.2.2 – Maximum Course Loads for Full-Time Students

In any Fall-Winter period, full-time students may be registered in no more than 36.0 units, and no more than 18.0 units in either of the Fall or Winter Terms, including any courses being taken elsewhere on a Letter of Permission. More than 30.0 units should not be sought for the purpose of making up a deficiency due to past failure, or if the student's cumulative GPA is less than 1.90. First-year students in most disciplines are not encouraged to attempt more than 30.0 units. A maximum of 30.0 units may be requested during the class selection period. A student must obtain written permission from the Office of the Associate Dean (Academic) in order to take more than 36.0 units in the Fall-Winter period (or more than 18.0 units in any one term), including any courses being taken elsewhere on a Letter of Permission. Students who wish to appeal a negative decision to take more than 36.0 units (or 18.0 units in any one term), must appeal to the Board of Studies in writing (see Appeal of Academic Decisions, Section 3).

3.2.3 – Maximum Course Loads for Internship Students

Students who are participating in the Queen’s University Internship Program (QUIP) are automatically enrolled in an internship course for each term of the internship. In addition to the INTN course, these students may also enrol in one 3.0- or 6.0-unit course only during each internship term, including but not limited to an independent study course.

3.3 – Part-Time Registration Status

3.3.1 – Maximum Course Load for Part-Time Students

Part-time students in any Arts and Science program may take up to a total of 9.0 units per term.

3.3.2 – Transfer to Full-Time Registration Status

Part-time students on a degree program are eligible to register in a full-time course load in accordance with Academic Regulation 3.2 if they have:

  1. completed a minimum of 24.0 Queen’s units, excluding repeated courses, and courses for which credit or aegrotat standing were assigned, from the time at which they were admitted part-time to a degree program or were placed on part-time status; and
  2. achieved a minimum cumulative GPA of 1.90;
    or
  3. completed a minimum of 18.0 Queen’s units, excluding repeated courses, and courses for which credit or aegrotat standing were assigned, from the time at which they were admitted part-time to a degree program or were placed on part-time status; and
  4. achieved a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.90.

3.3.3 – Maximum Course Load for Non-Degree Interest Students without Documentation

Students admitted to the Undergraduate Online Career, Non-Degree Interest category without documentation, may initially only enrol in one course at a time to a maximum of 6.0 units. In order to be able to enrol in further courses, such students must meet the criteria specified in Admission Regulation 11. This regulation may not be appealed.

3.4 – Courses Spanning More Than One Term

Note that for the purposes of determining a student’s course load, the total unit weighting of courses that span more than one term shall be divided equally between the two terms in which that course is operated (see Academic Regulation 4).

3.5 – Summer Term

Students normally take no more than two courses (regardless of unit value) at any time during the Summer Term, including any courses being taken elsewhere on a Letter of Permission. This is considered equivalent to a normal course load for a full-time student. Students on probation, with previous failures or with outstanding work from a previous term should not exceed this course load. Students in good standing who take more than two courses should closely monitor their ability to keep up with assigned readings, complete assignments on time and achieve a satisfactory academic standing in all work in each course. Students should be aware of the established deadlines for dropping courses without academic penalty and are expected to drop courses, if necessary, before these deadlines. Taking on more than two courses at any time during the Summer Term does not constitute sufficient grounds for an academic appeal to drop courses after the deadline.

3.6 – Registration in courses Offered by the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science

The number of Engineering and Applied Science courses that may be taken by Arts and Science students is limited, and may not exceed the number of Arts and Science courses taken in a given term.

Arts and Science students may, with permission of the instructor and the Associate Deans of both Engineering and Applied Science and Arts and Science, register for a maximum of two such courses in an academic term.

Students should note that, in accordance with the Academic Programs section of this Calendar:

  1. with the exception of the Plans listed in Academic Program Regulation 6.A., a maximum of 6.0 units from courses offered by the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science may be counted towards the Program and/or Plan requirements of any degree or certificate in the Faculty of Arts and Science;
  2. not all courses offered by the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science may be eligible for credit towards an Arts and Science degree program; and
  3. the unit weighting of such courses may not be deemed equivalent in the two Faculties.

3.7 – Registration in courses Offered by other Faculties and Schools

With the exception of students who have transferred from another Faculty or School into the Faculty of Arts and Science, and with the exception of the Plans listed in Academic Programs Regulation 8, a maximum of 6.0 units from courses offered by other Faculties and Schools may be counted towards the Program and/or Plan requirements of any degree or certificate in the Faculty of Arts and Science.

Some Plans allow more than 6.0 units from courses offered by other Faculties and Schools to count toward the Plan requirements. In these cases, the non-Arts and Science courses must be limited to those specified by the Plan (see Academic Programs Regulation 8).

Academic Regulation 4: Courses Spanning More Than One Term

4.1 – Nomenclature

Courses that span more than one term (multi-term courses) shall be divided into separate classes for each term in which they are offered. The class offered in the first term shall be denoted with the suffix “A” and the class offered in the second term shall be denoted with the suffix “B”.

4.2 – Prerequisites and Registration

4.2.1 – Prerequisites

The prerequisite, if any, for the first half of the course shall be that indicated in the Courses of Instruction section of this Calendar. When students enrol in the first half of the course using the online student centre (SOLUS), they will be automatically enrolled in the second half of the course. Note that some such courses may be offered in more than one lecture, tutorial and/or laboratory section. Students will be enrolled in the same section of each component of the course in both terms.

4.2.2 – Registration

Students must be enrolled in both halves of the course to be deemed to have registered in the course. Students who have failed to register in both halves of the course shall, following the deadline to add classes, have the section in which they have registered removed from their academic record by the Office of the University Registrar and shall be required to appeal to the Associate Dean (Academic) for late registration (see Appeal of Academic Decisions, Section 3).

4.3 – Dropping Multi-Term Courses

Students who wish to drop a multi-term course must drop the classes denoted with both the A and the B suffix on or before the Faculty’s published Fall Term Academic Dates for dropping a course without academic penalty; otherwise a grade of NG (not graded) shall be assigned to the A suffix. If a student wishes to drop a multi- term course after the deadline to drop Fall Term classes without academic penalty, but prior to the deadline to drop Winter Term classes without academic penalty, only the B suffix shall be expunged from the transcript. Students wishing to drop a multi-term course after the deadline to drop Winter Term classes without academic penalty must appeal to the Associate Dean (Academic). If the appeal is granted, a DR designation shall be placed on the transcript for the B suffix, and an NG designation shall remain on the A suffix. If the appeal is denied, the final grade earned shall remain on the transcript. A student may not appeal to remove a DR grade from the transcript. The chart below shows the impact of dropping multi-term courses on the academic transcript.

Timing of Multi-Term Course Drop Grade on Transcript: A Suffix Drop Grade on Transcript: B Suffix
By Fall Term deadline to drop without academic penalty Expunged Expunged
After Fall Term deadline to drop without academic penalty (upon successful appeal initiated before the Winter Term deadline to drop without academic penalty) DR Expunged
After Fall Term deadline to drop without academic penalty, but before the Winter Term deadline to drop without academic penalty NG Expunged
After Winter Term deadline to drop without academic penalty (upon successful appeal) NG DR

4.4 – Credit and Grading

The first half of a multi-term course shall earn 0.0 units and may not be used to meet the degree requirements of any program or Plan, or any prerequisite, corequisite or exclusion requirement. The earned units for the multi-term course shall be placed on the second half of the course. Upon successful completion of a multi-term course, the first half of the course shall be assigned a grade of NG (Not Graded) (see Academic Regulation 10). The final grade for the course, including any incomplete (IN) or grade deferred (GD) status shall be assigned to the second half of the course. Note that for the purposes of determining the student’s academic load, half of the units assigned to the full-year course will be applied toward the academic progress units for each term in which the course is offered (see Academic Regulation 3).

Students who drop a multi-term course, even after successfully completing the first half of the course, must enrol in and complete both halves of the course in a subsequent academic period in order to earn credit for the course.

4.5 – Appeals

No part of Academic Regulation 4 may be appealed.

Academic Regulation 5: Auditors

5.1 – Audit Policies

Students may not audit language acquisition classes, online classes, nor any class that is predominantly performance- based. Students must have the consent of the instructor(s) and Departmental Chair of Undergraduate Studies to audit other on-campus classes. In giving consent to audit a class, the instructor will discuss with the auditor to determine the extent of the auditor’s participation in classes, field trips, laboratories, etc. Auditors are not entitled to submit assignments or write examinations. Students are not required to apply for admission, but they must register formally as auditors through the Faculty Office. A fee will apply.

5.2 – Appeals

No part of Academic Regulation 5 may be appealed.

Academic Regulation 6: Attendance, Course Work and Conduct

6.1 – Participation and Conduct in Classes

Students must be enrolled in a class to be eligible to attend or otherwise participate in lectures, laboratories, tutorials, online discussions, tests, and examinations associated with the class. Students are expected to be, and at the discretion of the instructor, may be required to be present at all lectures, laboratories, tutorials, online discussions, tests, and examinations in their classes and to submit essays, exercises, reports, and laboratory work at the prescribed times. Student conduct in lectures, laboratories, tutorials, online discussions, tests and examinations must conform to the Code of Conduct. Students whose conduct does not conform to the Code of Conduct may be issued a warning in writing from the class instructor. Subsequent failure to conform to the Code of Conduct may result in a written requirement to withdraw from the class (see Academic Regulation 17).

6.2 – Submission of Course Work

For purposes of evaluation, assignments and other course work must be submitted in a readable format. Many instructors will require that work be submitted electronically, and will state this at the outset of the class.

6.3 – Absence and Missed Course Work

Students who experience extenuating circumstances that cause them to miss lectures, laboratory work, assignments, tests or examinations, should submit a request for academic consideration. Once the request has been made and as soon as they are able, students must contact their instructor(s) to make alternative arrangements for extensions or other consideration. A Verification of Illness form or other supporting documentation may be required, depending on the duration of the extenuating circumstances.

If there is a significant effect on attendance or academic performance such that the student may wish to request an incomplete grade, Aegrotat or Credit Standing, the student is responsible for obtaining appropriate documentation at the time of treatment. See Academic Regulation 10 for further information about Aegrotat and Credit Standing. Information about appeals to the Associate Deans (Academic) for Aegrotat or Credit Standing can be found in Appeal of Academic Decisions, Section 3.

Academic Regulation 7: Assessment of Performance

7.1 – Determination of the Final Grade for a Course

The choice of the elements to be used in determining the final grade for a course and the weighting of these elements are decided by the Department. The following elements may be used: the work of the term, including, where appropriate, essays and exercises, class tests, reports, seminar and online participation and laboratory work; a final examination.

Students who feel their final examination or final grade has not been accurately assessed may request a review of their work (see Academic Regulation 11).

7.2 – Scheduling of Class Elements

7.2.1 – Provision of a Class Syllabus

Before the end of the second week of the term in which a class starts, instructors must provide students with a class syllabus to include an outline of the basic features of the class. At a minimum, the class syllabus should include the intended student learning outcomes, a standardized definition of academic integrity and a clear statement of the basis on which final marks are assigned. Instructors should specify the term work expected and weight, if any, that it will contribute to the final mark. Any essential element(s) of the class that must be passed in order to pass the class must be included in the class syllabus. Essential elements might include laboratories, sight-singing tests or a final proctored examination.

Once distributed to students, the syllabus statement regarding the types and timing of the class elements that will contribute to the final grade may not be adjusted if the changes will disadvantage any student in the class.

7.2.2 – Testing During Class Periods

Subject to Academic Regulation 7.2.3, tests in regular class periods may be held by instructors at any time. An instructor may not schedule a test or examination outside of the scheduled class time if doing so creates a conflict with a student’s other officially scheduled class time.

7.2.3 – Restrictions on Assessment

Major tests and de facto examinations are strictly prohibited in the last two class weeks and in the study period designated by Senate prior to the examination period.

7.2.3.1 – Major Tests or Quizzes

A test or quiz is deemed to be major if it:

  1. takes place outside of a regular lecture or laboratory period; or
  2. covers more than the work of the preceding six weeks; or
  3. counts for more than 10 per cent of the final mark in a 6.0-unit class or 20 per cent of the final mark in a 3.0-unit class.
7.2.3.2 – De Facto Examinations, Major Term Essays, and Seminar Presentations

De facto examinations are essentially replacements for final examinations or end-of-term tests for which the Senate provides a schedule. A take-home examination that conforms to (2) and (3) above may not be due between the beginning of the 11th week of classes and seven days after the beginning of the examination period. A major term essay
– one that conforms to (3) above – should be assigned in the first half of the term if it is due any time between the beginning of the 11th week of classes and the end of the examination period. A seminar presentation that conforms to (1), (2) or (3) above should be assigned in the first half of the term if it is to be held in the last two weeks of term.

7.2.4 – Exceptions to the Restrictions on Assessment

Requests for exceptions must be made annually and must be approved by the Associate Dean (Academic). (Exceptions to the above guidelines might include individual oral examinations in language acquisition courses and laboratory examinations requiring the hands-on use of apparatus or materials.)

7.3 – Submission of Mid-Year Grades

At the end of the Fall Term, instructors of multi-term classes numbered P01 to 199 (with the exception of online classes) will submit mid-year grades. These grades are made available to students in January as an indication of their progress. Mid-year grades do not appear on official transcripts.

7.4 – Supplemental Course Work

After completion of the elements of the class that contribute to the determination of a student’s final grade in the class, as outlined in the class syllabus, a student may not submit additional work intended to raise the student’s final grade.

Academic Regulation 8: Final and Mid-Year Examinations

8.1 – Supplemental Examinations

There are no supplemental examinations or re-writes in courses offered in the Faculty of Arts and Science. A student who has made a valid attempt at writing a final examination cannot rewrite the examination at a later time (see Academic Regulation 8.4.3).

8.2 – Scheduling of Final and Mid-Year Examinations

8.2.1 – Timing of Final and Mid-Year Examinations

The final or mid-year examination in any class offered in any Term or Session (including on-campus and online classes) must be written at the end of the appropriate Term or Session at the time scheduled by the Examinations Office. The final examination schedule may not be changed once the schedule is posted.

Final examinations may not last longer than 3 hours, except in the case of exchange students (see Academic Regulation 8.5) or students who require accommodation requested through Queen’s Student Accessibility Services.

8.2.2 – Scheduling Conflicts

A student discovering a conflict (two examinations at the same hour, three consecutive examinations in a 24-hour period or an examination at the same hour as a religious observance) should report the conflict to the University Examinations Office, as soon as possible.

8.3 – Location of Final and Mid-Year Examinations

The final examination in any on-campus class offered in any Term or Session must be written on the campus on which the class was taken.

8.3.1 – Students Living in the Kingston Area During the Academic Term

Students living in the Kingston area during the academic term who are enrolled in either Queen’s on-campus or online classes, or both, are expected to write their mid-year and final examinations on the Kingston campus.

8.3.2 – Students Living outside the Kingston Area During the Academic Term

Students living outside the Kingston area who are enrolled in Queen’s online classes will write their mid-year and final examinations either:

  1. In-person at an approved off-campus examination centre; or
  2. Online using an approved online proctoring service.

8.3.3 – Students at the Bader International Study Centre

Students attending the Bader International Study Centre who are also enrolled in a Queen’s online class will write
their mid-year and final examinations at the Bader International Study Centre.

8.3.4 – Examination Centres for Online Classes

For students living outside the Kingston area, a list of established examination centres for online classes is available from Arts and Science Online. If there is not an established centre within 100 kilometres of a student’s residence, one will be established at no charge.

Students requesting a change to the examination centre location after the deadline to make these changes must contact Arts and Science Online. If a change is approved, an administrative charge will be assessed.

8.4 – Extenuating Circumstances affecting Final and Mid-Year Examinations

Students who are unable to write an examination at the scheduled time due to extenuating circumstances, beyond their control (such as serious illness, death in the family), should either make arrangements with the instructor to write a deferred examination, consider a request for an incomplete grade, or discuss other options for the course (see Academic Regulation 6.3). Note that personal plans do not qualify as extenuating circumstances under this Regulation.

Students who are unable to write an examination in an online class at the scheduled time due to extenuating circumstances, beyond their control, must also notify Arts and Science Online. Students who are granted permission by their instructor(s) to defer the examination(s) in their online classes to a subsequent term will be subject to a non- refundable administrative fee to reschedule each examination, including additional charges as may be incurred by the University to set up the deferred examination.

Normally students are not permitted to write an examination at a time earlier than the scheduled time.

8.4.1 – Extenuating Circumstances Warranting an Early Examination

Students seeking permission to write an examination at an earlier time than the scheduled time due to very exceptional circumstances, beyond their control, must make a written request to the Office of the Associate Dean (Academic).

8.4.2 – Extenuating Circumstances Occurring Immediately Prior to an Examination

Students who experience sudden illness or other extenuating circumstances, beyond their control, immediately prior to a scheduled examination, should not write the examination. Instead, students in such circumstances should submit a request for academic consideration prior to the examination start time. Once the request has been made and as soon as they are able, students must contact their instructor(s) to make arrangements to write a deferred examination. Students should remain available to write the deferred examination at the examination venue on short notice.

8.4.3 – Extenuating Circumstances Occurring During an Examination

Students who experience sudden serious illness during the course of writing a scheduled examination that prevents them from completing the examination, must notify an Examination Proctor prior to leaving the examination hall, or prior to exiting the examination session of an online proctored examination. The Faculty Office will liaise with the instructor of the course to determine if the examination attempt is considered valid. If students leave the examination hall or exit an online examination session without notifying an Examination Proctor, the examination attempt will be considered valid and no retroactive consideration will be possible.

If, after consultation with the instructor, the examination attempt is not considered to be valid, permission for the student to re-write the final examination may be granted for documented cases at the discretion of the instructor(s) and the Associate Dean (Academic). Alternatively, other options for the student to complete the course may be provided.

8.4.4 – Extenuating Circumstances Warranting an Examination Location Change

Students living in the Kingston area during the academic term who are unable to write an examination on the main campus due to extenuating circumstances, beyond their control, may, as soon as the need is apparent, make a written request to the Office of the Associate Dean (Academic) for permission to write the examination at an approved off-campus examination centre. The request must include the reason as well as documentation confirming the student’s circumstances. If permission is granted, an administrative charge will be assessed.

8.5 – Additional Examination Time for Official Exchange Students

Students studying at Queen’s on an official exchange and whose first language is not English may apply to the University Examinations Office for additional time of 0.5 hour to write each final examination. They may also bring one language translation dictionary to the examination.

8.6 – Access to Final Examination Question Papers

8.6.1 – Publication of Previous Years’ Examination Question Papers

For reference purposes, final examination question papers will normally be made available by the end of September (for the previous academic year) to students through their publication in the Exambank, which is available online. Exemptions from the policy for particular examination question papers may be granted by the Associate Dean (Academic) only in exceptional circumstances and only on an annual basis, on the written request of the instructor, and with the signed approval of the Head of Department.

8.6.2 – Release of Examination Question Papers as per Exchange Agreements

Exchange agreements may require instructors to release copies of final examinations, including those exempted from the policy in Academic Regulation 8.6.1 above, to exchange students for review by the home university.

8.7 – Formal Review of Final Examinations

Students who believe that their final examination has not been accurately assessed may request a formal review of the examination paper (see Academic Regulation 11).

Academic Regulation 9: Examination Conduct

9.1 – Admission to and Dismissal from the Examination Hall

Students are required to bring their Queen’s Photo ID to the examination and to display it at the top corner of the examination table. Any candidate arriving at an examination hall after the beginning of the examination will receive only the remaining time in which to write the examination. The late candidate’s paper will be marked only at the discretion of the Faculty. No candidate will be allowed to leave the examination hall within 30 minutes of the distribution of examination papers.

9.2 – Restrictions on Articles Taken Into the Examination Hall

No articles such as textbooks, notes, books of tables, data sheets, graphs, paper, written material, calculators, etc., may be taken into the examination hall unless authorized by the instructor in writing at least 3 days before the examination. Calculators acceptable for use during quizzes, tests and examinations are intended to support the basic calculating functions required by most Arts and Science courses. For this purpose, the use of the Casio 991 series calculator is permitted and is the only approved calculator for Arts and Science students.

Students should bring only essential items to the examination. Food, drinks (except bottled water in a transparent bottle), backpacks, computers and purses are not permitted in the examination hall. Any use of communication devices (including but not limited to cell phones, smart phones, smart watches, media players, earphones, headsets) and electronic devices with memory capabilities or web-access is prohibited during an examination. All electronic devices must be turned off and placed under the student’s seat. The University assumes no responsibility for personal property lost in or near any examination hall.

9.3 – Examination Regulations

A student is responsible for adhering to all Examination Regulations as published by the Office of the University Registrar and/or the Senate. All examination hall irregularities will be reported in writing by the Chief Proctor to the instructor of the course and to the Associate Dean (Academic). Normally, such irregularities will be dealt with under the regulations pertaining to departures from academic integrity (see Academic Regulation 1).

Academic Regulation 10: System of Grading and Transcript Notations

10.1 – Evaluative Grades

Normally, students receive letter grades for performance in courses offered by the Faculty of Arts and Science. The evaluative grades for all courses offered by the Faculty of Arts and Science are:

Letter Grade Description
A+ Exceptional
A Outstanding
A- Excellent
B+ Very Good
B Good
B- Reasonably Good
C+ Acceptable
C Minimally Acceptable (Honours)
C- Minimally Acceptable (General)
D+ Unsatisfactory Pass
D Unsatisfactory Pass
D- Unsatisfactory Pass
F Failure - No Course Credit

10.1.1 – Long Descriptors

The long descriptors provide a more detailed guide to what each letter grade signifies:

Letter Grade Description
A+ Indicates exceptional performance that exceeds the highest standards. The course content has been mastered, the ability to apply the material in new ways has been demonstrated, and an understanding of the wider context is evident, all to an exceptional degree. Consistent performance at this level leads to placement on the Dean’s Honour List with Distinction (see Academic Regulation 12).
A Indicates outstanding performance that meets the highest standards. The course content has been mastered, the ability to apply the material in new ways has been demonstrated, and an understanding of the wider context is evident.
A- Indicates excellent performance that meets very high standards. Mastery of the course material and ability to apply the material in new ways have been demonstrated. Consistent performance at this level leads to placement on the Dean’s Honour List (see Academic Regulation 12).
B+ Indicates excellent performance that meets very high standards. Mastery of the course material and ability to apply the material in new ways have been demonstrated. Consistent performance at this level leads to placement on the Dean’s Honour List (see Academic Regulation 12).
B Indicates good comprehension of the course material. The expectations set for the course have been met.
B- Indicates reasonably good comprehension of the course material. Most expectations set for the course have been met.
C+ Indicates an acceptable comprehension of the course material, meeting and in some cases exceeding basic standards.
C Indicates a generally acceptable comprehension of the course material, meeting basic standards. Consistent performance at this level is acceptablefor an Honours Degree(see Academic Regulation 16).
C- Indicates a minimally acceptable comprehension of the course material while falling short of basic standards in some areas. Consistent performance at this level is acceptable for a General Degree, but not for an Honours degree (see Academic Regulation 16).
D+ Comprehension of the course material was unsatisfactory, but sufficient for credit to be granted. Consistent performance at this level will lead to placement on Academic Probation and, potentially, further sanctions (see Academic Regulation 13).
D Comprehension of the course material was unsatisfactory, but sufficient for credit to be granted. Consistent performance at this level will lead to placement on Academic Probation and, potentially, further sanctions (see Academic Regulation 13).
D- Comprehension of the course material was unsatisfactory; barely sufficient for credit to be granted. Consistent performance at this level will lead to an automatic requirement to withdraw (see Academic Regulation 13).
F Indicates that the minimum standards have not been met. Credit has not been granted. Consistent performance at this level will lead to an automatic requirement to withdraw (see Academic Regulation 13).

10.2 – Pass/Fail Grades

A grade of Pass (P) may be assigned when a student meets or exceeds the minimum standards in a course that has been designated for pass/fail grading either by an academic unit in the Faculty of Arts and Science, or by the student as a Personal Interest Credit. A grade of Fail (F) will be given if the student does not meet the minimum standards in a course that has been designated for pass/fail grading. A course that has been assigned a grade of Pass will not be included in the student’s GPA but may be counted for credit towards a degree program. A grade of F in a course that has been designated for pass/fail grading will be included (with the corresponding grade point of 0.0) in any GPA calculation. Other non-evaluative grades (IN, GD, AG) may be entered in accordance with the academic regulations.

10.2.1 – Pass/Fail Grades in Courses Designated by Academic Units in the Faculty

While most courses in the Faculty will be graded using the letter-based grading system, some courses, particularly those of a technical or applied nature offered as part of a professional degree program or Plan, may be appropriately designated for pass/fail grading. An academic unit that wishes to designate a course for pass/fail grading must obtain approval for such a designation through the curriculum review process as outlined in the By-Laws of the Faculty Board, and all such designations are subject to the final approval of Faculty Board. Any course designated for pass/fail grading must clearly indicate this grading method in the course syllabus. All students enrolled in a course designated for pass/fail grading in this manner will be graded as such; letter grades will not be available.

10.2.2 – Pass/Fail Grades in Courses Designated by the Student (Personal Interest Credit)

A student may choose to designate a degree-credit course offered by the Faculty of Arts and Science for pass/fail grading that would normally have letter grading. The intention of such a designation is to encourage a student to explore subject matter in a field outside the program of study, to promote interdisciplinarity, and to minimize the risk to the student’s cumulative GPA.

A student may designate a course offered by the Faculty of Arts and Science in which they have enrolled for pass/fail grading by submitting the appropriate application form to the Office of the Associate Dean (Academic) before the deadline to drop the course without academic penalty in each term.

The following restrictions will apply to the designation of any pass/fail grading by the student:
The student must be registered in a degree program in the Faculty of Arts and Science;

  1. The student must have passed a minimum of 24.0 units taken in the Faculty of Arts and Science at Queen’s before a pass/fail course can be designated;
  2. The student must be in good academic standing at the time that a course is designated for pass/fail grading;
  3. The student may designate a maximum of 6.0 units for pass/fail grading throughout their Undergraduate and/or Undergraduate Online Careers (excluding any courses designated pass/fail by an academic unit, see Academic Regulation 10.2.1);
  4. The student may designate a maximum of one course per term for pass/fail grading;
  5. Once a course has been designated for pass/fail grading, the student may change this designation only up to the deadline to drop the course without academic penalty in each term. In the case of multi-term courses, the student may change the designation up to the deadline for the B half of the course. After this deadline, the student may not change this designation for any reason, regardless of academic performance;
  6. The student may not designate a course for pass/fail grading if there is a finding of a departure from academic integrity in the course;
  7. Only courses that are taken to fulfill the elective or total unit requirement of a degree program may be designated for pass/fail grading; no courses that may count as core, option or supporting courses to fulfill the requirements of any Plan in which the student is registered at the time of the pass/fail designation may be designated for pass/fail grading. If a student successfully completes a course designated for pass/fail grading and wishes to apply it toward the core or supporting course requirements of a Plan in which they subsequently register, they must obtain the agreement of the Department to substitute another appropriate course in its place. If a course designated for pass/fail grading is to be used to fill the option course requirements of a Plan in which the student subsequently registers, the student must choose a different option course; and
  8. Courses offered by other Faculties and Schools may not be designated for pass/fail grading.

No variation from the required course components and grading scheme as published in the course syllabus will be made for a student who designates a course for pass/fail grading. If the instructor assigns a grade of D- or greater as determined by the grading scheme, the student will be deemed to have met the minimum standard in the course and will be given a grade of P.

10.2.3 – Appeals

Academic Regulation 10.2.2 may not be appealed.

10.3 – Non-Evaluative Grades

10.3.1 – Aegrotat Standing

Aegrotat estimated standing in a course is reserved for situations in which a student, who has completed and passed at least 60 per cent of the work for a course, but because of illness or other extenuating circumstances beyond his or her control, is unable to complete all the work of the course (see Academic Regulation 6). Aegrotat grades will be included in the student’s grade point average (GPA), can be used as credit earned towards a degree program, and can be used to qualify for entry to a degree Plan.

A student seeking aegrotat standing in a class must submit a formal appeal to the Office of the Associate Dean (Academic) (see Appeal of Academic Decisions, Section 3). As part of the appeal, the instructor must indicate whether the student has demonstrated an understanding of the class material and must provide an estimation of the student’s grade in the class based on the work completed. If the request is granted, this estimated letter grade will appear on the student’s transcript together with a note reading “Aegrotat Estimated Grade.”
Students may be granted aegrotat and/or credit standing for a maximum of 36.0 units during their entire program.

10.3.2 – Credit Standing (CR)

Credit standing (CR) in a course is reserved for situations in which a student, who has completed all of the work of the course including the final examination, and achieved a passing grade in the course, but because of illness or other extenuating circumstances beyond his or her control, earned a substantially lower grade than might have been expected, normally a grade of C or lower (see Academic Regulation 6). A course with credit standing will not be included in the student’s GPA but can be used as credit earned towards a degree program. Students who wish to use a course in which they have credit standing as a prerequisite for registering in a further class may need to appeal to the instructor of the class if the prerequisite requirement includes a minimum grade. The instructor has the authority to waive this prerequisite at their discretion. Use of a course with credit standing for admission to a Plan shall be at the discretion of the Department.

A student seeking credit standing in a course must submit a formal appeal to the Office of the Associate Dean (Academic) (see Appeal of Academic Decisions, section 3). If the request is granted, the designation CR will appear on the student’s transcript in place of a letter grade, and the instructor will be notified of this change in grade.

Students may be granted aegrotat and/or credit standing for a maximum of 36.0 units during their entire program.

10.3.3 – Grade Deferred (GD)

Grade deferred standing (GD) is a temporary designation reserved for circumstances in which

  1. a student has submitted all the work in a course, but the final grade is not available (e.g. late assignments not yet marked); or
  2. a suspected departure from academic integrity is under investigation or under appeal and a final grade for the course cannot yet be determined.

The instructor shall indicate to the Associate Dean (Academic) the special circumstances under which the GD is being assigned, and in the case of (i) above, shall provide a timeline for submission of the final grade.

A grade of GD will not be included in the determination of a student’s GPA, and any course with a GD designation may not be counted for credit towards a degree program.

Note: GD differs from the notation IN, which indicates that a student has not submitted all the work assigned and the instructor has agreed to accept the outstanding work.

10.3.4 – Incomplete (IN)

Incomplete standing (IN) is a temporary designation reserved for a course in which a student who, because of extenuating circumstances beyond his or her control, has not completed all term work for a course or requests permission to defer the writing of a final examination. The student must have participated actively in the class and only one or two elements of the class may be outstanding. Students with extenuating circumstances who have been unable to complete the majority of the work in a class should consider an appeal to drop a class after the deadline rather than requesting an incomplete grade in the class.

A student seeking incomplete standing may be requested to provide, at the instructor’s discretion, a medical certificate or other documentation that demonstrates extenuating circumstances, and must arrange with the instructor to complete a “Permission for an Incomplete Grade or Deferred Examination” form available from the Arts and Science website. The “Permission for an Incomplete Grade or Deferred Examination” form indicates the current letter grade for the course based on the work completed, the specific work yet to be finished and a date by which the outstanding work will be submitted. The date for the work to be completed should be reached by mutual agreement between the instructor and student. Incomplete work can be submitted no later than the end of the subsequent term.

In cases where a student will receive a failing grade if all outstanding work is not completed or the exam is not written, an IN grade will be submitted by the instructor. A grade of IN will not be included in the determination of a student’s GPA, and any course with an IN designation may not be counted for credit towards a degree program. If the outstanding work is not submitted by the end of the subsequent term, the IN grade will lapse to an F (Failure) and will be included in the student’s GPA.

In cases where a student will pass the course even if the outstanding work is not completed or the exam is not written, the actual earned letter grade will be assigned. The letter grade shall be included in the student’s GPA and may be counted for credit towards a degree program. If the outstanding work is not submitted by the end of the subsequent term, the original letter grade shall stand.

Any extensions beyond the end of the subsequent term must be based on further extenuating circumstances and will require an appeal to the Office of the Associate Dean (Academic) with support from the instructor (see Appeal of Academic Decisions, Section 3).

10.3.5 – Transfer Credit (TR)

A transfer credit (TR) designation is reserved for a course in which a student undertakes study at another accredited post-secondary institution (see Academic Regulation 14). A transcript note will accompany this entry, indicating the University or other academic institution from which the credit was earned, and the degree program to which the transferred course is being credited. For purposes of internal evaluation of course prerequisites and admission to second year only, the TR designation shall be deemed equivalent to a grade of C. In the case of transfer credit for International Baccalaureate (IB), Advanced Placement (AP), CEGEP, or A-Level (GCE) courses, grades of A or B may also be deemed equivalent depending on student performance. Under no circumstances shall the grade provided by another post-secondary institution be placed on the Queen’s transcript.
 
Students who wish to use a course in which they have a TR designation as a prerequisite for registering in a further class may need to appeal to the instructor of the class if the prerequisite requirement includes a grade higher than
C. The instructor has the authority to waive this prerequisite at their discretion.

Transfer credit designations will not be included in the student’s GPA but may be counted for credit towards a degree program.

10.3.6 – Audit (AU)

The audit (AU) designation is reserved for courses in which a student officially attends a class as a registered auditor but in which the student does not undertake any work to be marked by the instructor.

Audit designations will not be included in the student’s GPA and may not be counted for credit towards a degree program (see Academic Regulation 5).

10.3.7 – Dropped (DR)

Any course dropped by a student before the date specified in the Faculty’s published academic calendar dates for dropping a course without academic penalty shall be expunged from the transcript. Students wishing to drop a course after the published date must appeal to the Associate Dean (Academic). If the appeal is granted, a DR designation shall be placed on the transcript. If the appeal is denied, the final grade earned shall remain on the transcript. A student may not appeal to remove a DR grade from the transcript.

Dropped designations will not be included in the student’s GPA and will not count for credit towards a degree program.

See also Academic Regulation 4 for details on transcript designations when dropping multi-term courses.

10.3.8 – Not Graded (NG)

The not graded (NG) designation indicates the completion of the first half of a multi-term course. A student will receive an NG designation at the end of the first term in which the class was in progress. At the end of the second term in which the course is offered a letter grade or other appropriate designation shall be entered.

Not graded designations will not be included in the student’s GPA and will not be counted for credit towards a degree program. No course with an NG designation may subsequently be counted as partial or full credit towards completion of another course at Queen’s University, or as transfer credit.

10.4 – Courses in Progress (no designation)

Transcripts shall note all courses in progress during the academic term in which they are offered. Such courses in progress shall have no designations attached to them.

10.5 – Grade Point Average (GPA)

10.5.1    – Letter Grade/Grade Point Table

All letter grades shall have grade points associated with them, according to the following table:

Letter Grade Grade Points
A+ 4.3
A 4.0
A- 3.7
B+ 3.3
B 3.0
B- 2.7
C+ 2.3
C 2.0
C- 1.7
D+ 1.3
D 1.0
D- .7
F 0.0

The grade point average (GPA) shall be calculated by multiplying the grade points earned in a course by the unit value of that course, then dividing by the total number of units attempted during the period of time over which the GPA is being determined. Grade point averages may be determined over three periods for evaluative purposes:

10.5.2 – Cumulative GPA

The cumulative GPA shall be determined using all courses attempted and for which grade points are assigned over the course of a student’s Career (Undergraduate or Undergraduate Online, see Academic Regulation 2.1). Thus, students who change Career will have two cumulative GPA’s on their academic record. The cumulative GPA used for all assessment purposes shall be the one associated with the student’s current Career of registration.

In the case of students who transfer into the Faculty of Arts and Science from another Faculty or School at Queen’s, Dual Degree students (including those in Concurrent Education programs) and Second Degree students, all courses attempted while registered in an Undergraduate Career in other Faculties/Schools and/or taken towards other degree programs shall continue to be included in the Undergraduate Career cumulative GPA used for evaluative purposes in the Faculty of Arts and Science. Unless otherwise indicated in the academic regulations, when reference is made to a GPA, a cumulative GPA is indicated.

10.5.3 – Plan GPA

The Plan GPA shall be determined using all core, option and supporting courses completed to fulfill the Plan requirements for the degree and for which grade points are assigned, regardless of the Career under which the courses are taken.

10.5.4 – Term GPA

The term GPA shall be determined using all courses attempted and for which grade points are assigned during a particular academic term.

10.5.5 – Academic Year GPA

The academic year GPA shall be determined using all courses attempted and for which grade points are assigned during a particular academic year starting on 1 September and ending on the subsequent 31 August.

10.5.6 – Retaking Courses

If an exact course is repeated, the highest mark achieved shall be used in the determination of the GPA. To determine which grade takes precedence when one of the course attempts results in a TR, the TR shall be considered equivalent to a grade of C. If a TR takes precedence it will not be used in the GPA calculation.

A course may normally be retaken for a total of three completed attempts.

10.5.7 – Students who began a course of study before 1 May 2011

Numeric (percentage) grades have been assigned to classes that were offered up to and including the Winter Term of 2011. These numeric grades will continue to appear on the transcript for students who began a course of study before 1 May 2011. However, cumulative percentage averages will not be used for any academic purpose from May 2011 onwards. GPA values will instead be calculated based on the grade points assigned to these numeric grades. For conversion purposes, numeric grades shall be associated with grade points according to the following table:

Numeric Equivalent (prior to 1 May 2011) Grade Points
90 - 100% 4.3
85 - 89% 4.0
80 - 84% 3.7
77 - 79% 3.3
73 - 76% 3.0
70 - 72% 2.7
67 - 69% 2.3
63 - 66% 2.0
60 - 62% 1.7
57 - 59% 1.3
53 - 56% 1.0
50 - 52% 0.7
0 - 49% 0.0

10.6 – Change of Grade

The deadline for submission of a change of final grade by an instructor can be no later than the end of the term following that in which the class was offered. If the change of grade is not submitted within that timeline, the existing grade in the course shall stand. Any extensions beyond the end of the subsequent term must be based on extenuating circumstances and will require an appeal from the student to the Associate Dean (Academic) with support from the instructor (see Appeal of Academic Decisions, Section 3).

Academic Regulation 11: Review of Graded Work in a Course

Students have the right to review all graded work in a course, including the final examination. All graded material that is not returned to the student must, according to Senate policy, be retained for a period of 12 months.

Information about appeals of instructors’ decisions on grading can be found in Appeal of Academic Decisions, Section 3.

Academic Regulation 12: Dean’s Honour Lists

12.1 – Dean’s Honour List

Students in a degree program who have obtained an academic year GPA of at least 3.50 at the end of the Summer Term, and who have not otherwise been placed on the Dean’s Honour List with Distinction, will be placed on the Dean’s Honour List.

To be eligible for the Dean’s Honour List, students must also meet the following criteria:

  1. They must be registered in a degree program in Arts and Science.
  2. They must have completed a minimum of 18.0 Queen’s units in the relevant Fall-Winter-Summer academic year, excluding courses with the non-evaluative grades AU, CR, DR, NG and P. Only courses that contribute towards the Arts and Science degree program will be included in the academic year GPA.
  3. There may be no failures and no repeated course enrolments in the relevant Fall-Winter-Summer academic year.
  4. There may be no outstanding IN or GD grades. All final grades and changes of grade must be submitted by 31 August, the final date for determination of an academic year GPA.

This honour will be noted on the student’s transcript.

12.2 – Dean’s Honour List with Distinction

For the purposes of determining eligibility for the Dean’s Honour List with Distinction, student academic performance will be compared to that of their peers within the following program groups:

  1. Arts: all students registered in the B.A., B.A.(Honours), B.F.A., B.F.A.(Honours), B.Mus., B.P.H.E. and B.P.H.E.(Honours) degree programs.
  2. Science: all students registered in the B.Sc., B.Sc.(Honours), B.Cmp. and B.Cmp.(Honours) degree programs.

Those students who have achieved an academic year GPA in the top 3 per cent of all students within their program group are eligible for consideration for the Dean’s Honour List with Distinction. They must also meet those eligibility criteria as outlined for the Dean’s Honour List in Academic Regulation 12.1.

This honour will be noted on the student’s transcript.

12.3 – Students on International Exchange Programs

Those students who have participated in an approved exchange program at an international partner university, and who have consequently attempted fewer than 18.0 units at Queen’s University during the relevant Fall-Winter- Summer academic year, may be considered for placement on the Dean’s Honour List, but will not be eligible for the Dean’s Honour List with Distinction.

To be eligible for consideration, the student must:

  1. Have participated in an approved international exchange program;
  2. Have completed a minimum of 15.0 units, and fewer than 18.0 units, at Queen’s University in the relevant Fall-Winter-Summer academic year (those students having completed 18.0 or more units at Queen’s will be automatically considered for the Dean’s Honour List under Regulation 12.1 above). Only courses that contribute towards the Arts and Science degree program will be included in the academic year GPA;
  3. Have achieved a minimum GPA of 3.50 on these units;
  4. Have no failures and no repeated course registrations in the relevant Fall-Winter-Summer academic year; and
  5. Have no outstanding IN or GD grades. All final grades and changes of grade must be submitted by 31 August, the final date for determination of an academic year GPA.

The student must provide a transcript from the host university. For the student to be placed on the Dean’s Honour List, the transcript from the host university must show:

  1. That the student was continuously registered in a full academic load;
  2. That the student achieved an academic standing consistent with a Queen’s GPA of 3.50; and
  3. That there were no failed courses, repeated courses, or outstanding grades during the relevant term(s) the student spent at the host university.

The Queen’s transcript must further show that all courses attempted at the host university were subsequently transferred for credit towards a degree program at Queen’s University.

This honour will be noted on the student’s transcript.

12.4 – Decisions on Dean’s Honour Lists

Because decisions related to this regulation are solely dependent on particular levels of academic performance, no part of Academic Regulation 12 may be appealed.

Academic Regulation 13: Academic Standing

13.1 – Assessment

Academic standing is assessed once a year at the end of the Winter Term. All students registered in a degree or certificate program who have attempted a minimum of 18.0 units since the time of admission to the Faculty of Arts and Science, shall be assessed. Assessment of academic standing is based solely on the cumulative GPA in the career in which the student is registered at the time of assessment.

All students who are assessed will be assigned one of the following academic standings, unless they have not attempted a minimum of 18.0 units since the time of their previous assessment, in which case they may be assigned a temporary standing.

13.2 – In Good Academic Standing

Students are described as being in good academic standing unless otherwise notified. Normally this means a cumulative GPA of at least 1.60.

13.3 – Academic Probation

13.3.1 – Criteria for Placement on Academic Probation

A student shall be placed on academic probation if they:

  1. have a cumulative GPA of less than 1.60 at the time of assessment; or
  2. return to studies after having previously been required to withdraw, even if that requirement to withdraw was waived on appeal; or
  3. are admitted to the Faculty of Arts and Science on full-time or part-time registration status on probation (see Admission Regulation 11).

The academic standing “Placed on Academic Probation” shall be placed on the student’s transcript.

13.3.2 – Academic Restrictions Resulting from Placement on Academic Probation

Students placed on academic probation are not permitted to register for classes offered at the Bader International Study Centre (BISC). Students may be considered for admission to the BISC after they are released from academic probation.

Students placed on academic probation will not be allowed to transfer units from another post-secondary institution for courses taken while on probation (see Academic Regulation 14.3).
 
Concurrent Education students who are placed on academic probation in the Faculty of Arts and Science will not be permitted to register in education classes until they are released from probation.

13.3.3 – Release from Academic Probation

Any student who is placed on academic probation, and who achieves a cumulative GPA greater than or equal to 1.60 at the time of their next academic standing assessment, shall be released from academic probation.

13.3.4 – Appeal of Decisions on Academic Probation

Because decisions related to this regulation are solely dependent on particular levels of academic performance, no part of Academic Regulation 13.3 may be appealed.

13.4 – Requirement to Withdraw for One Year (RTW1)

13.4.1 – Criteria for RTW1

A student shall be Required to Withdraw for One Year if they:

  1. have a cumulative GPA of less than 0.70 at the time of assessment; or
  2. are on academic probation at the time of assessment and have a cumulative GPA of less than 1.60.

The academic standing “Required to Withdraw for One Year” shall be placed on the student’s transcript.

Students who are on academic probation and have a cumulative GPA of less than 1.60, and who have not attempted
18.0 units since the time of their previous assessment, will not be Required to Withdraw for One Year, but instead will be allowed to continue their studies on probation, until they have attempted at least 18.0 units since being placed on probation.

The academic standing “Continuing on Probation” shall be placed on the student’s transcript.

13.4.2 – Academic Restrictions Resulting from RTW1

Students who have been required to withdraw for one year will not be permitted to register in the Faculty of Arts and Science, or enrol in any Queen’s courses, for twelve months. After a twelve-month period has passed students may register by contacting the Faculty of Arts and Science and submitting a Return to Studies Form.

Students who are required to withdraw for one year will not be allowed to transfer units from another post- secondary institution for classes taken while required to withdraw (see Academic Regulation 14.3).

13.4.3 – Appeal of Decisions on RTW1

Information about an appeal to waive the requirement to withdraw for one year can be found in Appeal of Academic Decisions, Section 3.

In exceptional circumstances, academic probation may be imposed by the Associate Dean (Academic) as an alternative to requiring a student to withdraw. The special conditions that the student must meet in such instances will be determined by the Associate Dean (Academic) on an individual basis.

If a student wishes to appeal the decision of the Associate Dean (Academic) the student must do so in writing to the Board of Studies (see Appeal of Academic Decisions, Section 3).

13.5 – Requirement to Withdraw for a Minimum of Three Years (RTW3)

13.5.1 – Criteria for RTW3

A student shall be Required to Withdraw for a Minimum of Three Years if they:

  1. have a cumulative GPA of less than 0.70 at the time of assessment and have previously been required to withdraw for one year, even if that previous requirement to withdraw was waived on appeal; or
  2. are on academic probation at the time of assessment, have a cumulative GPA of less than 1.60 and have previously been required to withdraw, even if that previous requirement to withdraw was waived on appeal. Note that any student who has been required to withdraw and returns to studies is automatically placed on academic probation under Academic Regulation 13.3. Therefore, any student previously required to withdraw must achieve a cumulative GPA of greater than 1.60 at their next academic assessment upon their return to studies, or they will be required to withdraw for a minimum of three years.

The academic standing “Required to Withdraw for a Minimum of Three Years” shall be placed on the student’s transcript.

Students who are on academic probation, have a cumulative GPA of less than 1.60 and have previously been required to withdraw, and who have not attempted 18.0 units since the time of their previous assessment, will not be Required to Withdraw for a Minimum of Three Years, but instead will be allowed to continue their studies on probation, until they have attempted at least 18.0 units since being required to withdraw.

The academic standing “Continuing on Probation” shall be placed on the student’s transcript.

13.5.2 – Academic Restrictions Resulting from RTW3

Students who have been required to withdraw for a minimum of three years will not be permitted to register in the Faculty of Arts and Science, or enrol in any Queen’s courses, for a minimum of thirty-six months. After the minimum withdrawal period of three years has passed, students who wish to return to Queen’s must appeal to the Office of the Associate Dean (Academic) to be able to return to their studies after the minimum withdrawal period has lapsed (see Appeal of Academic Decisions, Section 3). All students who return to studies in the Faculty of Arts and Science after a period of absence of three years or more are subject to the degree program requirements in effect at the time of their return.

Students who are required to withdraw for a minimum of three years will not be allowed to transfer units from another post-secondary institution for classes taken while required to withdraw.

13.5.3 – Appeal of Decisions on RTW3

Information about an appeal to waive the requirement to withdraw for three years can be found in Appeal of Academic Decisions, Section 3.

If a student is within 12.0 units of completing a degree, that student’s case will be reviewed by the Associate Dean (Academic), who may impose a lesser penalty. In exceptional circumstances, academic probation may be imposed by the Associate Dean (Academic) as an alternative to requiring a student to withdraw. The special conditions which the student must meet in such instances will be determined by the Associate Dean (Academic) on an individual basis.

If a student wishes to appeal the decision of the Associate Dean (Academic) the student must do so in writing to the Board of Studies (see Appeal of Academic Decisions, Section 3).

13.6 – Other Requirements to Withdraw

The Associate Dean (Academic) may, at any time, either during the term or after the close of the term, determine that a student whose attendance, work, or progress is deemed unsatisfactory, be required to withdraw from the Faculty of Arts and Science.

The Associate Dean (Academic) will notify the student in writing of the potential requirement to withdraw, the reasons for the decision, and advise the student of the opportunity to respond to the potential requirement to withdraw. The student must also be advised of the right to have representation for any response made to the potential requirement to withdraw. (On matters of procedure and representation, the University Dispute Resolution Advisors are available for consultation and assistance.)

Normally the Associate Dean (Academic) will convene a meeting with the student (and his or her representative) and, where appropriate, instructors (and their representatives) and witnesses, to thoroughly review the case for the potential requirement to withdraw. This investigation may involve written submissions and/or oral evidence presented by witnesses concerning the grounds for the potential requirement to withdraw. The student must be notified, in writing, when the meeting on the case will be convened, invited to appear at the meeting, and be advised of the right to have representation at the meeting. At least 7 calendar days prior to the meeting, the student has a right to know what, if any, material from the student’s file will be considered.

After considering the available evidence, the Associate Dean (Academic) must inform the student in writing of the decision to require the student to withdraw from the Faculty. The student must also be informed in writing of the opportunity to appeal the decision to the Board of Studies (see Appeal of Academic Decisions, Section 3).

13.7 – Honours Warning

13.7.1 – Criteria for Honours Warning

A student shall be given an honours warning if they have a cumulative GPA of greater than or equal to 1.60 but less than 1.90 at the time of assessment and are otherwise in good academic standing.

The academic standing of honours warning will not be placed on the student’s transcript. Instead, the student will be informed in writing that while they are currently in good academic standing, their GPA is such that they would be ineligible to receive an Honours degree.

13.7.2 – Appeal of Decisions on Honours Warning

A student may not appeal an honours warning standing because it is the direct result of a particular level of academic performance. The honours warning standing, as such, does not remove them from good academic standing.

13.8 – Not Eligible to Proceed to an Honours Degree

13.8.1 – Criteria for being deemed Not Eligible to Proceed to an Honours Degree

A student shall be deemed to be not eligible to proceed to an Honours Degree if they have attempted 132.0 or more units at the time of assessment and have a cumulative GPA of less than 1.90.

The academic standing “Not Eligible to Proceed to an Honours Degree” shall be placed on the student’s transcript.

13.8.2 – Academic Restrictions Resulting from Not Eligible to Proceed to an Honours Degree

A student who has been deemed not eligible to proceed to an Honours Degree may not enrol in further classes in the Faculty of Arts and Science excepting those that may be required in order to complete a non-Honours degree program with a general Plan. Permission to enrol in such classes must be sought from the Associate Dean (Academic).

13.8.3 – Appeal of Decisions Related to the Not Eligible to Proceed to an Honours Degree Standing

A student may not appeal a “Not Eligible to Proceed to an Honours Degree” standing because it is the direct result of a particular level of academic performance.

Academic Regulation 14: Credit for Courses Taken Elsewhere

14.1 – Letters of Permission

Subject to the requirements of Academic Regulations 3.2.2 and 16, a student on a degree program in the Faculty of Arts and Science may be permitted to take undergraduate classes elsewhere for credit toward a degree offered by the Faculty of Arts and Science. The student must obtain a Letter of Permission from the Arts and Science Faculty Office prior to enrolling in classes at another post-secondary institution. There is a non-refundable application fee for a Letter of Permission.

The Letter of Permission is issued for a specified post-secondary institution and for a specified term. The student must begin the class(es) in the term specified in the Letter of Permission. Failure to do so will require the student to apply for either a new or a retroactive Letter of Permission in order to transfer the credit(s) toward the Queen’s degree.

To obtain a Letter of Permission, a student must be in good academic standing (see Academic Regulation 13), have a minimum cumulative GPA of 1.60, have completed a minimum of 6.0 units on a degree program in the Faculty of Arts and Science and must not have more than 3.0 units of incomplete grades in a previous term (grade of IN). A student who is completing the final course(s) of an honours degree must have a minimum Plan GPA and a minimum cumulative GPA of 1.90.

14.2 – Conditional Letters of Permission: Level 1 Students

A student who has completed fewer than 24.0 units may apply for a conditional Letter of Permission if their cumulative GPA on any courses taken (including mid-year grades on multi-term courses) is at least 1.60. The conditional Letter of Permission will be valid if the student completes a minimum of 6.0 units with a minimum cumulative GPA of 1.60; otherwise the conditional Letter of Permission will be considered null and void, and the student will not be permitted to transfer any units taken at another post-secondary institution.

14.3 – Students Required to Withdraw or on Probation

Courses taken at other post-secondary institutions by Arts and Science students while on academic probation or under a requirement to withdraw will not be transferred to Queen’s (see Academic Regulations 15 and 13).

14.4 – Level 3 and 4 Students

Normally the last two years of an Honours degree are taken in the Faculty of Arts and Science at Queen’s. A student in Level 3 or 4 may request a Letter of Permission to transfer up to 6.0 units from another post-secondary institution. A level 3 or 4 student who wishes to spend all or part of the third or fourth year of an Honours program at another post-secondary institution must appeal to the Associate Dean (Academic). The student must be in good academic standing, have achieved a cumulative GPA of at least 1.60 (subject to the restriction in Academic Regulation 14.1) and must obtain the written permission of the Department(s) administering his or her Plan(s). If approval is granted, the student must then obtain a Letter of Permission from the Arts and Science Faculty Office prior to applying to the host institution as a visiting student.

14.5 – Registration Status

A student who has obtained a Letter of Permission should register at the host institution as a visiting student rather than as a student on a degree program. Registering at the host institution on a degree program will jeopardize the student’s admission status at Queen’s, and the student will be required to apply to Undergraduate Admission for readmission to Queen’s (see Academic Regulation 15). A Letter of Permission issued to a student who subsequently transfers to another post-secondary institution will be considered null and void.

14.6 – Obtaining Transfer Credit

To transfer credit to Queen’s for a class taken elsewhere, a passing final grade equivalent to at least C at Queen’s (minimum grade of 63 on percentage-based scale) must be obtained, unless otherwise stated on the Letter of Permission. The transfer credit, not the grade achieved, will be transferred to the student’s record at Queen’s (see Academic Regulation 10). Transfer credits for courses taken at another post-secondary institution will not be added to the student’s record at Queen’s unless the student is in good academic standing. It is the responsibility of the student to submit an original transcript in a sealed envelope directly from the host institution to the Faculty of Arts and Science Office. The original transcript will be maintained on file in the Office of the University Registrar.

14.7 – Procedures to Graduate

A student who is granted a Letter of Permission to complete the final course(s) of his or her degree program at another post-secondary institution during the Fall-Winter academic year, and who intends to graduate in the Spring convocation, must submit an official transcript in a sealed envelope to the Faculty of Arts and Science Office by the second week of May. Meeting this deadline will ensure that the student’s name appears in the convocation program and that the student’s diploma is printed for the day of the ceremony.

A student who is granted a Letter of Permission to complete the final course(s) of his or her degree program at another post-secondary institution during the Summer Term, and who intends to graduate in the Fall convocation, must submit an official transcript to the Faculty of Arts and Science Office by the first week of October. Meeting this deadline will ensure that student’s name appears in the convocation program and that the student’s diploma is printed for the day of the ceremony.

14.8 – Departures from Academic Integrity in Courses Taken Elsewhere

If notification is received by the Faculty of Arts and Science of a finding of a departure from academic integrity in a course taken by an Arts and Science student while studying at another post-secondary institution on a Letter of Permission, the finding will be kept in a special file in the Office of the Associate Dean (Academic) that will only be accessed if there is a subsequent finding.

Academic Regulation 15: Voluntary Withdrawal and Return to Studies

15.1 – Voluntary Withdrawal

Students may withdraw voluntarily, without academic penalty, prior to deadlines published in this Calendar (see Academic Dates). It is recommended that students consult with an academic advisor in the Faculty of Arts and Science Office before withdrawing. Students must drop all their classes and return their student cards to the Faculty of Arts and Science in order to withdraw from Queen’s.

15.2 – Return to Studies

15.2.1 – Exchanges and Letters of Permission

Students who were away during the preceding Fall or Winter Term on an exchange or on a letter of permission (see Academic Regulation 14) may resume their registration without any further special action.

15.2.2 – Students Required to Withdraw or on Probation

Students who were required to withdraw for one year or who were placed on academic probation may attend another post-secondary institution while away from the University. However, they will not be permitted at any time to transfer credits for courses taken elsewhere while required to withdraw or while on academic probation (see Academic Regulations 13 and 14). These students must complete and return the appropriate section of the Return to Studies form to the Faculty of Arts and Science Office in order to register in classes.

Students who were required to withdraw for a minimum of three years must further appeal to the Associate Dean (Academic) (see Academic Regulation 13) in order to register in classes once at least three years have elapsed.

15.2.3 – Students in Good Academic Standing

15.2.3.1 – Not Attending another Institution

Those students who have registered in the Faculty of Arts and Science, who have attempted at least one course and are in good academic standing, who did not attend any other post-secondary institution while away from the University, and who wish to return, must complete and return the appropriate section of the Return to Studies form to the Office of the Associate Dean (Academic) in order to register in classes. This should be done as early as possible and no later than 1 April of the year in which they wish to return in order to have access to the summer period for enrolling in Fall and Winter classes.

15.2.3.2 – Attending another Institution without Leave

Those students in good academic standing who, without a letter of permission:

  1. were registered in a two- or three-year diploma program at a post-secondary institution, but did not graduate; or
  2. completed a graduate program at another post-secondary institution,

and who are willing to waive their right to any transfer credit earned while withdrawn from the University, must complete and return the appropriate section of the Return to Studies form to the Office of the Associate Dean (Academic) in order to enrol in classes.

Those students in good academic standing who, without a letter of permission, completed 18.0 or fewer units (including failures) as a visiting student at another post-secondary institution, and who wish to have transcripts evaluated for the purpose of receiving transfer credit, must apply for a retroactive letter of permission. Students making an application for a retroactive letter of permission should be aware that there is no guarantee that their credits will be transferred toward their degree program.

Those students in good academic standing who:

  1. transferred to a university degree program at another post-secondary institution (excluding a graduate program); or
  2. graduated from a two- or three-year diploma program at a post-secondary institution; or
  3. without a letter of permission, completed more than 18.0 units (including failures) at another post- secondary institution; or
  4. hold any other status at another post-secondary institution not described in this regulation, must apply for readmission as an external student (see Admission Regulations 5 and 12). Such students must meet the minimum admission requirements for external students to be accepted, and are not guaranteed access to all Plans, including that in which they were registered before leaving Queen’s.

15.3 – Appeals

No part of Academic Regulation 15 may be appealed, as this regulation deals with matters of admission to the Faculty. Admission matters are explicitly excluded from the appeals process in accordance with the Senate Policy on Student Appeals, Rights and Discipline (SARD).

Academic Regulation 16: Requirements for Graduation

16.1 – Honours Degrees

16.1.1 – GPA Requirements

The awarding of the B.A.(Hons.), B.Cmp.(Hons.), B.F.A.(Hons.), B.Mus., B.P.H.E.(Hons.) and B.Sc.(Hons.) degrees is conditional on receiving a minimum cumulative GPA of 1.90 in the Undergraduate Career and a minimum GPA on the courses used towards the Plan requirements of the degree as follows:

  1. For Specialization and Major Plans, a minimum GPA of 1.90.
  2. For Major-Minor Plan combinations, a minimum GPA of 1.90 on the Major Plan requirements, and a minimum GPA of 1.60 on the Minor Plan requirements.
  3. For Medial Plan combinations, a minimum GPA of 1.90 on the requirements of each of the Medial Plans.

16.1.2 – Total Unit Requirement

For students admitted to the Faculty of Arts and Science prior to the Fall Term 2017, the awarding of the B.A. (Hons.) degree is conditional on the successful completion of a minimum of 114.0 units.

Effective for students admitted to the Faculty of Arts and Science in the Fall Term 2017 and later, the awarding of the B.A.(Hons.) degree is conditional on the successful completion of a minimum of 120.0 units.

The awarding of the B.Cmp.(Hons.), B.F.A.(Hons.), B.P.H.E.(Hons.) and B.Sc.(Hons.) degrees is conditional on the successful completion of a minimum of 120.0 units.

The awarding of the B.Mus. degree is conditional on the successful completion of a minimum of 126.0 units.

16.1.3 – Applying Transfer Credits

Effective for students admitted to the Faculty of Arts and Science in the Summer Term 2016 and later, no more than
57.0    units in the program (60.0 for the B.Mus. program) and no more than the following number of units in the
Plan(s) may be transfer credits (grade of TR) from outside Queen’s University:

  1. For Specialization Plans, one-half less 6.0 units of the total required for the Plan;
  2. For Major Plans, 24.0 units excluding supporting courses;
  3. For each Medial Plan, 18.0 units;
  4. For Minor Plans, as per the corresponding General Plan requirements noted below in Academic Regulation 16.2.3.

16.2 – General Degrees

16.2.1 – GPA Requirements

The awarding of the B.A., B.Cmp., B.F.A., B.M.T., B.P.H.E. and B.Sc. degrees is conditional on receiving a minimum cumulative GPA of 1.60 in the career in which the student is registered at the time of graduation, and a minimum GPA of 1.60 on the courses used towards the general Plan requirements of the degree.

16.2.2 – Total Unit Requirement

The awarding of the B.A., B.Cmp., B.F.A., B.M.T., B.P.H.E. and B.Sc. degrees is conditional on the successful completion of a minimum of 90.0 units.

16.2.3 – Applying Transfer Credits

No more than 42.0 units in the program and no more than the following number of units in the Plan may be transfer credits (grade of TR) from outside Queen’s University:

  1. For the General Arts (B.A.) Plans, 12.0 units excluding supporting courses;
  2. For the General Computing or Science (B.Cmp. or B.Sc.) Plans, 18.0 units excluding supporting courses;
  3. For the General Fine Art (B.F.A.) Plan, 24.0 units excluding supporting courses;
  4. For the General Physical and Health Education (B.P.H.E.) Plan, 24.0 units excluding supporting courses.

16.3 – Degrees with Distinction

16.3.1 – Requirements for Degree with Distinction

Graduation with Distinction recognizes the highest level of academic performance at Queen’s. A Degree with Distinction will be awarded to students who have achieved the following:

  1. a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.50 in the Undergraduate and Undergraduate Online Careers; and
  2. a minimum GPA of 3.50 on the courses used towards all the Plan requirements of each of the Plans that comprise the degree; and
  3. no failed grades, no outstanding IN or GD grades, and no repeated classes during their Undergraduate and Undergraduate Online Careers.

16.3.2 – Applying Transfer Credits

As per Academic Regulation 10, transfer credits (grade of TR) are not used towards the calculation of any GPA. Therefore, for students offering courses from other universities to meet the Queen’s degree requirements, the GPA is calculated on Queen’s courses only.

16.4 – Certificates and Diplomas

16.4.1 – GPA Requirements

The awarding of a certificate or diploma is conditional on receiving a minimum cumulative GPA of 1.60 in the career in which the student is registered at the time of graduation, and a minimum GPA of 1.60 on the courses used towards the requirements of the certificate or diploma.

16.4.2 – Total Unit Requirement

The awarding of a certificate or diploma is conditional on the successful completion of the minimum number of units required for the certificate or diploma. A maximum of 50 percent of the units required may be counted toward the requirements of both the certificate or diploma and another degree program, certificate or diploma.

16.4.3 – Applying Transfer Credits

No more than 50 percent of the units in the certificate or diploma may be transfer credits (grade of TR) from outside
Queen’s University.

16.4.4 – Timing of Completion of Certificate or Diploma

A certificate or diploma may be awarded together with, after receiving, or after qualifying for a degree, or on its own.

16.5 – Course Requirements

All courses required to fulfill the program and Plan requirements for the degree, certificate or diploma must be completed, including appropriate core, option, supporting and elective requirements. The completed courses may not be counted toward more than one requirement within a program or Plan. Plan overlap rules as detailed in the Academic Programs section of this Calendar must be followed. In exceptional cases, departments may permit the substitution of other core, option and/or supporting course requirements in the Plan. In no circumstances may Plan overlap restrictions be waived.

16.6 – Appeal of Decisions on Requirements for Graduation

As decisions related to this regulation are solely dependent on particular levels of academic performance, no part of Academic Regulation 16 can be appealed.

16.7 – Application to Graduate

A degree, certificate or diploma candidate must apply to graduate during the final year of the program, or at least by 30 April for Spring convocation and by 15 October for Fall convocation.

Academic Regulation 17: Misconduct in an Academic or Non-Academic Setting

17.1 – Unacceptable Behavior within the Context of a Class

17.1.1 – Cases Handled by the Instructor

When unacceptable behaviour occurs in the context of a specific component of a class in which the student is registered (e.g. lectures, laboratories, field trips, clinical settings) the instructor may deal with the matter by notifying the student in writing of the alleged behaviour, the possible sanctions, and the opportunity to respond to the allegation. Possible sanctions may include, but are not limited to, a statement of apology, the assignment of work reflecting on the unacceptable behaviour, and/or refusal to accept work submitted by the student pertinent to the portion of the class in which the behaviour took place.

The student must also be advised of the right to have representation for any response made to the allegation of unacceptable behaviour in the context of a class. (On matters of procedure and representation, the University Dispute Resolution Advisors are available for consultation and assistance.)

Normally the instructor will meet with the student (and his or her representative) to conduct a thorough investigation of the available evidence. This investigation may involve written submissions and/or oral evidence presented by witnesses to the alleged unacceptable behaviour. At least 10 calendar days prior to the meeting, the student has the right to know what, if any, material from the student’s file will be considered.
 
After considering the available evidence, the instructor must inform the student in writing of the decision and the sanction, if any, that will be imposed. If a sanction is imposed, the instructor must inform the student in writing of the opportunity to appeal the finding and/or the sanction to the Associate Dean (Academic) (see Appeal of Academic Decisions, Section 3).

17.1.2 – Cases Handled by the Associate Dean (Academic)

If the matter is more serious than the sanction an instructor can impose would satisfy, the case should be referred by the instructor to the Associate Dean (Academic) who may impose sanctions ranging from those noted above to requiring the student to withdraw from the class or recommending to Senate that the student be required to withdraw from the Faculty or from the University.

The instructor must inform the student in writing that the case has been referred to the Associate Dean (Academic). The Associate Dean (Academic) will notify the student in writing of the alleged behaviour, the possible sanctions, and the opportunity to respond to the allegation. The student must also be advised of the right to have representation for any response made to the allegation of unacceptable behaviour. On matters of procedure and representation, the University Dispute Resolution Advisors are available for consultation and assistance.

Normally the Associate Dean (Academic) will convene a meeting with the student (and his or her representative), the instructor (and his or her representative), and witnesses where appropriate, to conduct a thorough investigation of the available evidence. This investigation may involve written submissions and/or oral evidence presented by witnesses to the alleged misconduct. The student and instructor must be notified, in writing, when the meeting on the case will be convened, invited to appear at the meeting, and be advised of the right to have representation at the meeting. At least 10 calendar days prior to the meeting, the student has the right to know what material will be considered.

After considering the available evidence, the Associate Dean (Academic) must inform the student in writing of the decision and the sanction, if any, that will be imposed. If a sanction is imposed, the Associate Dean (Academic) must inform the student in writing of the opportunity to appeal the finding and/or the sanction to the Academic Integrity and Conduct Panel (see Appeal of Academic Decisions, Section 3).

17.2 – Unacceptable Behaviour Outside the Context of a Class

When unacceptable behaviour occurs in an academic or academic-related setting, but not in the context of a class in which the student is registered (e.g. other classes), the aggrieved party shall refer the case either to the Judicial Committee of the Alma Mater Society (or of the Graduate Student Society if appropriate), or to the Committee on Non-Academic Discipline. Before referring the case to either body, the aggrieved party is advised to consult with the University Secretariat.

17.3 – Cases Handled by the Committee on Non-Academic Discipline

When the sanctions specified above in Academic Regulation 17.1 are deemed inadequate or inappropriate by the instructor or the Associate Dean (Academic), the matter shall be referred by either the instructor or the Associate Dean (Academic) to the Committee on Non-Academic Discipline. The clerk of the relevant Judicial Committee shall then be notified by the Chair of the Committee on Non-Academic Discipline of this referral. (If the Judicial Committee Clerk does not agree that the Committee on Non-Academic Discipline, rather than the Judicial Committee, has jurisdiction in the case, the Chair of the University Student Appeal Board shall decide on the forum in which the case is to proceed.)

The Committee on Non-Academic Discipline may impose such sanctions as it considers appropriate including withdrawal from the Faculty, and recommendation to the Senate for dismissal from the University.

17.4 – Appeal and Review of Decisions

17.4.1 – Appeal of a Decision Made by the Associate Dean (Academic)

If the student is not satisfied with a decision referred to in Academic Regulation 17.1, the next stage of review lies with the Committee on Non-Academic Discipline. The student is advised to consult a University Dispute Resolution Advisor or the Dean of Student Affairs. In all cases, within 21 calendar days of receiving the decision, the student must send an appeal in writing to the Chair of the Faculty Board, who will refer it to the Committee.

The Committee will consider the appeal and, subject to Academic Regulation 17.4.2, its decision will be final.

17.4.2 – Appeal of a Decision Made by the Committee on Non-Academic Discipline

Any appeal of a decision made by the Committee on Non-Academic Discipline shall be made through the system for handling grievances as recorded by the Senate Policy on Student Appeals, Rights and Discipline, available from the University Secretariat.

Academic Regulation 18: Jurisdiction

18.1 – Arts and Science Students Registered in Courses Offered by Other Faculties/Schools

Arts and Science students registered in courses offered through another Faculty or School are governed by the academic regulations of the Faculty of Arts and Science, with the exception of Academic Regulation 1 (Academic Integrity). In accordance with the Senate Policy on Academic Integrity Procedures, the initial investigation of a departure from academic integrity and any referral of an academic integrity case will take place under the regulations of the Faculty or School offering the course. Appeals will continue to take place in accordance with the regulations of the Faculty of Arts and Science. In the case of a finding of a departure from academic integrity, the Faculty or School offering the course will disclose the departure to and consult with the Associate Dean (Academic) of the Faculty of Arts and Science before imposing any sanction. Upon such disclosure, the severity of any such departure shall be assessed by the Associate Dean (Academic) as being equivalent to Level I or Level II and a record of the departure shall be retained by the Faculty of Arts and Science in accordance with the process outlined in Academic Regulation 1. Consistent with Academic Regulation 1, this record may be taken into consideration in determining a sanction were a further finding of a departure from academic integrity to occur.

18.2 – Students from Other Faculties/Schools Registered in Arts and Science Courses

Students from other Faculties or Schools registered in a course offered through the Faculty of Arts and Science are governed by the academic regulations of their home Faculty, with the exception of any academic regulations of that Faculty or School pertaining to academic integrity. In accordance with the Senate Policy on Academic Integrity Procedures, the initial investigation of the departure and any referral of the case to the Associate Dean (Academic) will take place under Academic Regulation 1 (Academic Integrity) of the Faculty of Arts and Science. In the case of a finding of a departure from academic integrity, the Associate Dean (Academic) will disclose such finding to the appropriate authority in the student’s home Faculty or School and will consult with that authority before imposing any sanction.

18.3 – Students Registered in Multiple Programs within Queen’s University

With respect to matters pertaining to an individual course, students registered in multiple programs (including certificate and diploma, concurrent education and Dual Degree programs) will be governed by the academic regulations of the Faculty under which they register for the course.

18.4 – Bader International Study Centre

Arts and Science students resident at the Bader International Study Centre continue to be governed by the academic regulations of the Faculty of Arts and Science, with the following modifications. With the exception of Academic Regulation 1 (Academic Integrity), in all regulations below that refer to decisions made by the Executive Director, the Executive Director may choose to delegate responsibility for those decisions to the Academic Director and/or the Deputy Academic Director.

18.4.1 – Academic Regulation 1 (Academic Integrity)

The Executive Director of the Bader International Study Centre will carry out the duties of the Associate Dean (Academic), as outlined in Academic Regulation 1. The Executive Director may choose to consult with or to transfer these duties to the Associate Dean (Academic) at his/her discretion. The Executive Director must transfer these duties if the departure from academic integrity is such that it might warrant one of the following sanctions as outlined in Academic Regulation 1:

  1. the rescinding of University- or Faculty-awarded scholarships, prizes and/or bursaries;
  2. a requirement to withdraw from the Faculty for a specified minimum period of time;
  3. a recommendation to withdraw from the University for a specified minimum period of time; or
  4. a recommendation for the revocation or rescinding of a degree.

Once a finding and sanction are made, a record of the finding shall be forwarded to the Associate Dean (Academic) and retained in the student file as a Level I or Level II departure, as appropriate.

18.4.2 – Academic Regulation 3 (Number of Units in a Term and Academic Year)

Students registered at the Bader International Study Centre take a normal full-time load of 15.0 units in each of the Fall and Winter Terms, and 6.0 to 9.0 units in the Summer Term. Only with the approval of the Executive Director and in rare and exceptional circumstances will students be permitted to take more than the normal full-time course load per term.

18.4.3 – Academic Regulation 7 (Assessment of Performance)

In addition to those restrictions on assessment outlined in Academic Regulation 7, field studies will also not be conducted in the last week of classes and any designated study/examination period of the Fall and Winter Terms, or in the last four days of classes and any designated study/examination period of the Summer Term.

Exceptions must be approved by the Executive Director. (As per Regulation 7, these might include individual oral examinations in language acquisition courses and laboratory examinations requiring the hands-on use of apparatus or materials.)

In lieu of mid-year grades, Level 1 students will be provided with a summary of their academic progress in early January of Winter Term, and shall be required to discuss their progress with an academic advisor.

18.4.4 – Academic Regulation 8 (Final Examinations and General Examinations)

Exam scheduling conflicts found by the student shall be brought to the attention of the Executive Director.

18.4.5 – Academic Regulation 9 (Examination Conduct)

Examination hall irregularities shall be brought to the attention of the Executive Director.

18.4.6 – Academic Regulation 10 (System of Grading and Transcript Notations)

Appeals for Aegrotat, Credit standing (CR), to add or drop a course after the academic deadline, or to change a grade after the stated deadlines shall be to the Executive Director. If an appeal is made to modify grades on multiple courses or if a successful appeal would change a student’s academic progression standing, the Director shall first consult with the Associate Dean (Academic).

Upon submitting a grade of incomplete (IN) the instructor shall provide a copy of the “Permission for an Incomplete Mark” form to the Executive Director. The Executive Director will hear any appeals for an extension of an incomplete grade beyond either the date of the first agreement or the end of the subsequent term.

Upon submitting a grade deferred (GD), the instructor will inform both the Executive Director and the Associate Dean (Academic) of the circumstances under which this grade is being submitted and the timeline for submission of a final grade.

18.4.7 – Academic Regulation 11 (Review of Grades and Examinations)

Appeals to review the grade assigned in a course shall be to the Executive Director.

18.4.8 – Academic Regulation 15 (Voluntary Withdrawal and Return to Studies)

If a student chooses to leave the Bader International Study Centre, they must normally do so before the academic deadline to drop courses. If, following withdrawal, a student chooses to continue their studies on the main campus, they may register in courses in which there is space available and for which they meet the academic prerequisites, provided the deadline for adding courses has not passed. If the deadline has passed, they must appeal to the Associate Dean (Academic) for permission to add the courses late, citing extenuating circumstances. If they wish to drop courses without academic penalty after the deadline they must appeal to the Associate Dean (Academic) for permission to drop the courses late, citing extenuating circumstances. All appeals will be reviewed according to the usual guidelines outlined in Appeal of Academic Decisions, Section 3.

18.4.9 – Academic Regulation 17 (Misconduct in an Academic or Non-Academic Setting)

Academic Regulation 17 is superseded by the regulations and policies of the Bader International Study Centre regarding non-academic misconduct in both an academic and non-academic setting.

If a student is required to leave the Bader International Study Centre involuntarily as a result of misconduct in an academic or non-academic setting, the Associate Dean (Academic), in consultation with the Dean of Student Affairs, will determine whether the student may be accommodated through on-campus or online studies. In determining whether such an accommodation is available, the Associate Dean (Academic) will consider the following factors:

  1. The nature of the misconduct;
  2. The same course or one which is essentially equivalent is being taught on the Kingston campus or online, during the term in question;
  3. The course has sufficient space available;
  4. The instructor of both the original Bader International Study Centre course and the Kingston campus or online course are amenable to this arrangement and are prepared to jointly assess the student’s grade, as appropriate; and
  5. It is in the best academic interests of the student to continue his/her studies at that time.

If continuing on the Kingston campus or in online studies is not possible, then the Faculty will coordinate with the Bader International Study Centre to make reasonable accommodation for the student to sit any remaining tests or examinations and to receive any written course materials.

18.5 – Collaborative Degree Programs Offered Jointly with Other Postsecondary Institutions

Arts and Science students registered in a collaborative degree program offered jointly with another postsecondary institution (the “partner institution”) shall be governed by the academic regulations and policies of the Faculty of Arts and Science and of the Senate with respect to all matters pertaining to Queen’s University. They will similarly be bound by the regulations and policies of the partner institution with respect to all matters pertaining to that institution. The following modifications of the academic regulations apply:

18.5.1 – Academic Regulation 1 (Academic Integrity)

Upon a finding of a departure of academic integrity, and once all avenues of appeal are exhausted, the Associate Dean (Academic) shall disclose to the partner institution the nature and details of the case. The partner institution may use this information as its academic regulations direct.

The nature and details of any departure from academic integrity that take place at the partner institution shall likewise be disclosed to the Associate Dean (Academic). Upon disclosure, the severity of any such departure shall be assessed by the Associate Dean (Academic) as being equivalent to Level I or Level II and a record of the departure will be retained in accordance with the regulations. Any finding of a departure from academic integrity at the partner institution will not incur any further sanction once it is reported to the Faculty of Arts and Science. However, it may be taken into consideration as a factor in determining the severity of a sanction if a further finding of a departure from academic integrity were to occur at Queen’s.

18.5.2 – Academic Regulation 2 (Enrolment and Registration Priorities)

A student shall normally be registered in a specific Program and Plan as a result of being admitted to a collaborative degree program. Should the student withdraw from the collaborative program, either voluntarily or through failure to meet the progression requirements of the partner institution, the student will be allowed to continue in the Program and Plan in which they are registered, provided that they have not been required to withdraw under Academic Regulation 13. If their Program/Plan is unavailable outside of the collaborative degree program in which they were originally registered, they will be offered a place in the most closely corresponding Program and Plan. If the student wishes to transfer to an otherwise different Program and Plan, they must follow the procedures and meet the academic requirements otherwise outlined in Academic Regulation 2.

18.5.3 – Academic Regulation 10 (System of Grading and Transcript Notations)

Courses attempted at the partner institution will not appear directly on a Queen’s transcript unless transfer credit is granted. Similarly, grades obtained in courses attempted at the partner institution will not be considered when evaluating a student’s cumulative, term, or academic year GPA.

18.5.4 – Academic Regulation 12 (Dean’s Honour Lists)

Courses attempted at the partner institution will not be considered when evaluating a student’s eligibility for the Dean’s Honour List or Dean’s Honour List with Distinction.

18.5.5 – Academic Regulation 13 (Academic Standing)

If, at the time of assessment, a student is found to be in anything other than good academic standing at Queen’s, the partner institution shall be informed of the student’s academic standing status. If the student is registered in an honours degree Plan as part of the collaborative degree program, the partner institution will also be informed if an academic warning has been transmitted to the student. Likewise, if the student is assessed to be in anything other than good academic standing by the partner institution, the Faculty of Arts and Science shall be informed of this fact.

Following assessment in the Faculty of Arts and Science:

  1. if the student is in good academic standing, is given an academic warning, or is placed on probation, they shall be permitted to continue in the collaborative degree program, provided that the partner institution supports their continued registration.
  2. If the student is required to withdraw for one or three years, they shall also be required to withdraw from the collaborative degree program. Upon return to studies, they shall no longer be registered in a collaborative degree program and they must register in another program and Plan as outlined in Academic Regulations 2 and 18.5.2.
  3. If the student is deemed Not Eligible to Proceed in Honours and the Plan of registration in the collaborative degree program is an honours Plan, they shall be required to withdraw from the collaborative degree program. They shall be permitted to continue in a degree program in the Faculty of Arts and Science under the provisions outlined in Academic Regulation 13.8.

If, for any reason, the partner institution places the student on an academic standing status similar to that of academic probation or an academic warning in the Faculty of Arts and Science, while allowing them to remain in the collaborative degree program, the student will also be permitted to continue in the collaborative degree program by the Faculty of Arts and Science.

If, for any reason, the student is required by the partner institution to withdraw from the collaborative degree program, the student’s academic record in the Faculty of Arts and Science will be assessed immediately upon the Faculty being informed of this decision by the partner institution. The following shall then occur:

  1. If the cumulative GPA is less than 0.7, the student will be required to withdraw, for one year if this is the first requirement to withdraw, or for three years if they have been previously required to withdraw.
  2. If the cumulative GPA is greater than or equal to 0.7 but less than 1.6, and the student has been previously required to withdraw, they shall be required to withdraw for three years.
  3. If the cumulative GPA is greater than or equal to 0.7 but less than 1.6, and the student is currently on academic probation, the student will be required to withdraw for one year.
  4. If the cumulative GPA is greater than or equal to 0.7 but less than 1.6, and the student is in otherwise good academic standing, the student shall be placed on academic probation, but may choose to continue within the Faculty of Arts and Science in their Program and Plan as outlined in Academic Regulations 2 and 18.5.2. The academic probation status shall come into effect immediately.
  5. If the cumulative GPA is greater than or equal to 1.6, the student will remain in good academic standing. They may choose to continue within the Faculty of Arts and Science in their Program and Plan as outlined in Academic Regulations 2 and 18.5.2.
  6. If the cumulative GPA is less than 1.9, and the student has made 132.0 or more unit attempts, the student shall be deemed to be Not Eligible to Proceed in Honours. In this case, the provisions outlined in Academic Regulation 13.8 shall come into effect immediately.

In all cases, a requirement to withdraw will come into effect at the end of the Winter Term. If a student is registered in courses, they may continue to attempt those courses until that time. Upon return to studies, they shall no longer be registered in a collaborative degree program and they must register in another Program and Plan as outlined in Academic Regulations 2 and 18.5.2.

All students may appeal a requirement to withdraw from the Faculty of Arts and Science in the usual way through the academic appeal regulations. If the requirement to withdraw is imposed by the partner institution, then they must make any appeal according to the regulations of that institution.

18.5.6 – Academic Regulation 15 (Voluntary Withdrawal and Return to Studies)

If a student withdraws voluntarily from the collaborative program and from the Faculty of Arts and Science but continues to pursue their studies at the partner institution, then later decides to return to the Faculty of Arts and Science, they shall be bound by the provisions of Academic Regulation 15. Students are warned that they may be required to apply for admission to the Faculty as an external student and admission will therefore not be guaranteed.

18.5.7 – Academic Regulation 16 (Requirements for Graduation)

Courses attempted at the partner institution will not be considered when evaluating a student’s eligibility for a Degree with Distinction.