Academic Calendar 2021-2022

Courses of Instruction in Other Faculties and Schools

Courses of Instruction in Other Faculties and Schools

Effective September 2016, and with the exception of students who have transferred from another Faculty or School into the Faculty of Arts and Science, a maximum of 6.0 units from courses offered by other Faculties and Schools may be counted towards the Program and/or Plan requirements of any degree in the Faculty of Arts and Science. Policies related to courses in specific Faculties/Schools are listed below.

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science

Faculty Office: Beamish Munro Hall, Room 300
Faculty Office Telephone: 613-533-2055
Website: http://calendar.engineering.queensu.ca
A limited number of Engineering courses are open to Arts and Science students. See the Academic Degree Programs section 8.A. for the regulations concerning the courses that may be counted towards a degree in Arts and Science.

Faculty of Health Sciences

Faculty Office: Botterell Hall, Room 563
Faculty Office E-Mail Address: bhsc@queensu.ca
Faculty Office Telephone: 613-533-2566
Website: https://bhsc.queensu.ca/
The following Health Sciences courses are open to Arts and Science students, subject to the limit stated above and in Academic Programs section 6.B. For a complete description, see the Bachelor of Health Sciences website at https://bhsc.queensu.ca.

BMED 381  Clinical Biochemistry  Units: 3.00  

PATH 381 covers advanced topics of biochemistry and analytical chemistry in relation to the practice of clinical biochemistry in healthcare. Students will critique how laboratory principles, biochemistry, and analytical techniques are applied to practical medical problems in the context of various diseases. Through problem-based learning approaches, students will gain experience in identifying and troubleshooting issues in laboratory testing as well as the integrated role of clinical biochemists within a healthcare team.

Requirements: Minimum 3rd year (Level 3) standing and one of (BCHM 270/3.0 or BCHM 218/3.0), or permission of the instructor.  
Offering Faculty: Faculty of Health Sciences  
BMED 384  Integrative Laboratory Course  Units: 3.00  

This course will be a two-week intensive multidisciplinary laboratory course conducted in-person on the Queen's University Campus. Students will participate in a variety of laboratories, including in the disciplines of physiology, pharmacology, anatomy, microbiology, and biochemistry. Students will learn a number of different laboratory techniques, developing skills in scientific methodology, data acquisition and interpretation. Students will also attain skills in critical thinking and hypothesis development, as well as gain experience in writing laboratory reports, anatomy bell-ringers, presenting their results in posters, debates and in oral presentations. Priority access to this course will be granted to students in the Bachelor of Health Sciences program.

Requirements: BMED384reqs >or= 3rd yr and ((PHGY210orPHGY214)or(PHGY215PHGY216)), and (PHAR230orPHAR270orPHAR340). EXC LISC 390 391.  
Offering Faculty: Faculty of Health Sciences  
BMED 390  Integrative Laboratory Course  Units: 3.00  

This course will be a two-week intensive multidisciplinary laboratory course conducted in-person on the Queen's University Campus. Students will participate in a variety of laboratories, including in the disciplines of physiology, pharmacology, anatomy, microbiology, and biochemistry. Students will learn a number of different laboratory techniques, developing skills in scientific methodology, data acquisition and interpretation. Students will also attain skills in critical thinking and hypothesis development, as well as gain experience in writing laboratory reports, anatomy bell-ringers, presenting their results in posters, debates and in oral presentations.

Requirements: Minimum 3rd year (Level 3) standing and (one of PHGY 210/6.0 OR PHGY 214/6.0 OR [PHGY 215/3.0 and PHGY 216/3.0]), and (one of PHAR 230/3.0; PHAR 270/3.0; PHAR 370/3.0; PHAR 340/3.0), or permission from the instructor. Equivalency LISC 390/3.0  
Offering Faculty: Faculty of Health Sciences  
BMED 470  Principles of 'Omics'  Units: 3.00  

BMED 470 Principles of 'Omics' will build on information learned in BCHM 370 as well as explore the integration of genomics with other 'omics' such as transcriptomics, epigenomics, proteomics, and metabolomics data in the study of mechanisms controlling biological processes and disease risk. This course will cover technological advances in omics data collection, computer systems for management and processing, as well methods for the integrative analysis of large-scale omics data in biomedical research.

Requirements: Minimum 4th year (Level 4) standing and one of (BCHM 370/3.0; BIOL 331/3.0) or permission of the instructor.  
Offering Faculty: Faculty of Health Sciences  
BMED 480  Clinical Applications of Human Anatomy  Units: 3.00  

BMED 480 is a comprehensive course on regional anatomy of the human body covering the major organ systems, their components and the relationships between them. This course builds on fundamental knowledge of anatomy in order to apply it to clinical case-based scenarios. Students will apply anatomy and physiological knowledge gained in order to collaborate with peers to explore clinical problems, as well as develop their own realistic clinical case based problems on an underlying anatomical issue.

Requirements: BMED 480 Reqs >or=4th year and (PHGY 170 or BIOL 102), and (ANAT 270 or ANAT 215 or ANAT 216 or ANAT 315 or ANAT 316) or permission of the instructor.  
Offering Faculty: Faculty of Arts and Science  
BMED 483  Advanced Topics In Infectious Diseases  Units: 3.00  

This course will examine basic principles of infectious diseases such as Pathophysiology, Epidemiology and Transmission, and Control of Infectious Agents including an emphasis on Antimicrobial Therapy and Resistance.
Selected Infectious Disease syndromes will be examined to explore unique host microbe interactions. Students will work through the topics online using interactive multimedia modules. Student assessment will include weekly online quizzes, group, and individual assignments. Active participation will also form part of student assessment. At the completion of the course, students will have an understanding of the key concepts of emerging topics in infectious diseases.

Requirements: Minimum 4th year (Level 4) standing and one of (MICR 320/3.0; MICR 270/3.0; MICR 221/3.0; MICR 271/3.0), or permission from the instructor.  
Offering Faculty: Faculty of Health Sciences  
GLPH 271  Global and Population Health  Units: 3.00  

In this course, the learning emphasis will be on global and population health, instead of the health of individuals. As a discipline, global and population health prioritizes partnerships and resource sharing, instead of unilateral relationships, as well as having an important focus on advocacy.
NOTE Also offered online.
LEARNING HOURS may vary: 114 (36O;78P)

Requirements: Minimum 2nd year (Level 2) standing or permission of the instructor.  
Offering Faculty: Faculty of Health Sciences  
GLPH 385  Biohacking & Gerontechnology  Units: 3.00  

This course introduces and encourages the use of a global perspective to critically analyze technology developed to support/biohack human aging ranging from basic gerontechnologies that are currently in use to support older adults aging in place to cutting edge anti-aging technology.
NOTE: Also offered online
LEARNING HOURS may vary: 120(72O;48P)

Requirements: Minimum 3rd year (Level 3) standing, or permission from the instructor.  
Offering Faculty: Faculty of Health Sciences  
GLPH 471  Advanced Global and Population Health  Units: 3.00  

Students will take knowledge gained from GLPH 271, and apply it in this course, which will focus on more advanced topics of population and global health, as well as provide experiential learning.
NOTE: Also offered online
NOTE: Learning Hours may vary.

Requirements: Minimum 4th year (Level 4) standing and GLPH 271/3.0, or permission of the instructor.  
Offering Faculty: Faculty of Health Sciences  
GLPH 472  Special Populations: Neonatal to End-of-Life-Care  Units: 3.00  

In this online course, students will examine how variations in determinants of health can affect delivery of health care to special populations and shape health policy. Specific populations covered will include neonates, marginalized populations, those in intensive and end-of-life palliative care.

Requirements: Minimum 4th year (Level 4) standing and IDIS 373/3.0, or permission of instructor.  
Offering Faculty: Faculty of Health Sciences  
GLPH 493  Global Health Practice  Units: 3.00  

This course will strengthen students' abilities to respond to a community's health needs through a practical service learning position with an approved local or international community health organization. Students will apply a reflective approach to community engagement in global health and consider the relationship between global health practice.
NOTE Registration must occur by permission through the Bachelor of Health Sciences Office.
132(60Pc;36O;36P)

Requirements: Minimum 4th year (Level 4) standing and GLPH 271/3.0.  
Offering Faculty: Faculty of Health Sciences  

Faculty of Law

Faculty Office: Sir John A. Macdonald Hall, 128 Union Street
Faculty Office Telephone: 613-533-2220
Website: https://law.queensu.ca/jd-studies/jd-academic-calendar
The following Law courses are open to Arts and Science students, subject to the limit stated above and in Academic Programs section 6.B. Students must meet the prerequisite indicated in order to enrol in these courses during the summer class selection period.

LAW 201  Introduction to Canadian Law  Units: 3.00  

Introduction to Canadian Law is designed for students from all disciplines, all ages, and all walks of life. The course provides students with an introduction to the Canadian legal and judicial systems. You'll learn where our laws come from, how Quebec and the rest of Canada operate under different legal systems, and how our government and courts are structured. You'll get to know the role of lawyers and judges in our society, and how legal ethics determine what they can and cannot do. You'll get brief -- but thorough -- introductions to the ""greatest hits"" of Canadian law: the Charter of Rights and the Constitution Act, 1867; Criminal Law; Torts; Contracts; Property Law; Business Law; Intellectual Property; International Law; and Workplace Law.

Requirements: LAW 2## Exclusions  
Course Equivalencies: LAW201; LAW201B  
Offering Faculty: Faculty of Law  
LAW 202  Aboriginal Law  Units: 3.00  

"Reconciliation between the Canadian state and the Aboriginal peoples of Canada is a central concern of Canadian law in the 21st century, one that reaches into every sector of Canadian society. Resource development, environmental regulation, the criminal justice system, constitutional politics, international relations, intellectual property rights, social welfare policy, cultural development, health care services, education, and language policy are only some of the areas where an understanding of the law relating to Aboriginal peoples has become an urgent necessity.
This course will introduce students to the historical, social and political forces at play in developing the legal framework surrounding the relationship between the Canadian state and the Aboriginal peoples of Canada, and discuss new developments that are reshaping the legal landscape. These forces include increased recognition of Aboriginal rights to land, the duty to consult, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls."

Requirements: LAW 2## Exclusions  
Offering Faculty: Faculty of Law  
LAW 203  Workplace Law  Units: 3.00  

For most Canadians, the laws that govern work relations are a critical determinant of income, satisfaction, fairness, safety, and ultimately, fulfillment. In Workplace Law, you will learn about the various legal regimes that regulate work relations: the common law regime; the regulatory regime which includes employment standards, health and safety rules, and human rights; and the collective bargaining regime that applies to unionized workplaces. Get to know one of the fastest-evolving and active areas in law: change is the only constant as workplaces are affected by economic, historical, political and global forces.
You will finish this course with an understanding of the legal and social issues at play in the laws that apply to work.

Requirements: LAW 2## Exclusions  
Offering Faculty: Faculty of Law  
LAW 204  Corporate Law  Units: 3.00  

Corporate Law is intended to give students an introduction to corporate law, with a primary focus on the creation, structure and animus of the corporation. As we move to a highly fluid, dynamic, global and entrepreneurial business environment, many students will be seeking opportunities to start or participate in new ventures, and the proposed course will be an invaluable addition to the knowledge they will need to be successful. The course will provide students with an understanding of business associations, securities regulation and banking, as well as examining sources of business regulation.

Requirements: LAW 2## Exclusions  
Offering Faculty: Faculty of Law  
LAW 205  Public & Constitutional Law  Units: 3.00  

Public & Constitutional Law provides an overview of general principles of public law, focusing on the institutions and organs of government, the sources and nature of the legal rules that create them, and the limits on their powers. The course also introduces the essential elements of the Canadian legal system, such as democracy, the rule of law, constitutional supremacy, parliamentary sovereignty, judicial independence and federalism. The course will cover the rights enshrined in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, as well as those aboriginal and treaty rights guaranteed by s. 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982.

Requirements: LAW 2## Exclusions  
Offering Faculty: Faculty of Law  
LAW 206  Intellectual Property  Units: 3.00  

This course offers a general overview of Intellectual Property law in Canada, from a practical perspective. It explores trade secrets and patentable inventions, how to recognize and protect trademarks, when copyright applies and when it¿s infringed, and reviews typical license terms. Students will learn the forms of intellectual property protection available, and why it¿s important to their future careers and/or business ventures.

Requirements: LAW 2## Exclusions  
Offering Faculty: Faculty of Law  
LAW 207  International Law  Units: 3.00  

Students will learn the fundamentals of public International Law and the international legal order. Topics to be covered include the United Nations, treaties, sovereign immunity, the law of war, international criminal law, and international human rights law. Students will discuss international legal issues of contemporary and timeless significance.

Requirements: LAW 2## Exclusions  
Offering Faculty: Faculty of Law  

School of Nursing

Nursing Office: Cataraqui Building, 92 Barrie Street
Nursing Telephone: 613-533-2668
Website: https://nursing.queensu.ca/undergraduate
The following Nursing courses are open to Arts and Science students, subject to the limit stated above and in Academic Programs section 6.B. For a complete description, see the School of Nursing Web Calendar at https://qshare.queensu.ca/Users01/nursing/public/calendar/Academic_Calendar.pdf.

NURS 100  Nutrition And Health  Units: 3.00  

This course is about nutrition as a determinant of health through the study of nutrient metabolism, nutrition throughout the life span, nutrition behaviour, and nutritional considerations for select health conditions. Students will learn about the role of nutrition in promoting health within the context of their professional discipline. A required course for students of nursing science and relevant for students in life science and other health professions. 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended 12U Chemistry or Biology, or by permission of the instructor.

Requirements: in BNSc and Exclusion: HLTH 230  
Course Equivalencies: HSCI230; NURS100  
Offering Faculty: Faculty of Health Sciences  
NURS 323  Introduction to Statistics  Units: 3.00  

An introduction to the analysis of data from real life situations. The course covers sampling methods, descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include probability, t-tests, regression, Chi-square tests, analysis of variance, and study design. Emphasis is placed on the foundation of statistical inference and the practical application of statistical methods using statistical software. 1 hour lecture and 1.5 tutorial per week

Requirements: BNSC students only  
Offering Faculty: Faculty of Health Sciences  
NURS 324  Nursing Research  Units: 3.00  

This course is about the basic principles and processes of conducting nursing research, and how to practice using an evidence-informed approach. The student will learn how to identify researchable problems, how to search for evidence, and how to critique and make decisions about the quality and applicability of published research, as well as how to design and implement a research study. The student will acquire the knowledge necessary to critically use research in clinical practice and for beginning participation as a junior member of a nursing research study. 3 hours lecture per week.

Requirements: Exclusions: HLTH252. Registration in BNSC  
Offering Faculty: Faculty of Health Sciences  
NURS 346  Professional Nursing  Units: 3.00  

This course addresses the emergence of nursing as a profession, the growth of professional nursing within two contexts, Great Britain and Canada, and current issues in the delivery of nursing services from a global perspective.  6 hours a week Spring term or 3 hours a week Fall term.

Requirements: BNSC students only  
Offering Faculty: Faculty of Health Sciences  
NURS 425  Managing for Success  Units: 3.00  

This course focuses on three key skills that a successful manager possesses; an understanding of financial management, negotiation and influence. In the three components of the course learners will examine, among other things, basic ideas of finance and accounting and how health care is funded in various jurisdictions; styles of negotiation and bargaining for an agreement; how people are influenced and how to exert influence to achieve personal and organizational goals. 3 hours lecture per week

Requirements: >or= to 4th yr  
Offering Faculty: Faculty of Health Sciences  

Smith School of Business

Commerce Office: Goodes Hall, Room 130
Commerce Telephone: 613-533-2301
Website: https://smith.queenu.ca/bcom
Students may take any COMM course numbered below 600, subject to the limit stated above and in Academic Programs section 6.D. First-year Arts and Science students are not permitted to enrol in commerce courses for the Fall or Winter Terms during the summer class selection period. While no first-year student will be permitted to add a Fall Term Commerce course, adding a Winter Term course will be permitted on an individual basis during the open enrolment period.

While any COMM course may be counted as part of the 6.0 units allowed, the following Commerce courses are typically open to Arts and Science students. Note that this is not an exhaustive list, as many 300- and 400-level COMM courses may also be taken. Students must meet the prerequisites (or their equivalents) in order to enrol in all commerce courses. For a complete description, see the Commerce Program Web Calendar at https://smith.queensu.ca/bcom/academic_calendar/browse_calendar/2015_16_started/curriculum/courses_instruction.php.

COMM 200  Business Fundamentals  Units: 3.00  

This course will develop an appreciation of the role of the manager and business in society. It will discuss Canadian and global trends and issues - political, economic, technological, and ethical - that affect business and management. The course will introduce the student to the nature of the modern corporate enterprise, large and small, and begin the building of business analysis skills.

Requirements: This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 2nd yr or greater of their program, excludes Commerce/CIB. EXCLUSION: No more than one course from COMM 103 or COMM 200/600 or COMM 201/601. No more than 6.0 units from any COMM 200-level course.  
Course Equivalencies: COMM103/200/600  
Offering Faculty: School of Business  
COMM 201  Introduction to Business for Entrepreneurs  Units: 3.00  

This course introduces students to the language of business, as well as the main functional areas of business, and demonstrates how these areas interact to produce and market products and/or services in an economically viable manner. An emphasis is placed on both strategic and tactical development and execution in entrepreneurial contexts. The course also assists students in developing an understanding of the nature of the modern entrepreneurial enterprise in Canadian and international contexts, and of the tasks, practices, and responsibilities of its leaders. Of particular importance is the use of a capstone simulation - like the Capsim Strategy Simulation, but one geared towards entrepreneurial ventures - whose focus lies in the development and application of fundamental strategic management skills and financial analysis interpretation for decision-making purposes. The approach of the course is to challenge students to strive to develop a base-level competency in business principles which they can effectively transfer to their future entrepreneurial venture.

Requirements: This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 2nd yr or greater of their program, excludes Commerce/CIB. EXCLUSION: No more than one course from COMM 103 or COMM 200/600 or COMM 201/601. No more than 6.0 units from any COMM 200-level course.  
Offering Faculty: School of Business  
COMM 211  Financial Accounting  Units: 3.00  

As the initial course in accounting, this course provides a foundation of accounting knowledge necessary to the fuller appreciation of many aspects of business. The structure of the process of accounting is studied, with particular emphasis on the use, interpretation, and communication of financial information.

Requirements: This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 2nd yr or greater of their program, excludes Commerce/CIB. EXCLUSIONS: No more than one course from COMM 211 or COMM 611 or EMPR 280 No more than 6.0 units from any COMM 200-level course.  
Course Equivalencies: COMM111/211/611  
Offering Faculty: School of Business  
COMM 212  Management Accounting  Units: 3.00  

An examination of the internal accounting model and related information systems designed to keep the manager informed for the purposes of planning and controlling the organization's operations.

Requirements: This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 2nd yr or greater of their program, excludes Commerce/CIB. PREREQUISITE: COMM 111/211 EXCLUSIONS: No more than one from COMM 212/612 or EMPR 280 No more than 6.0 units from any COMM 200-level course.  
Course Equivalencies: COMM112/212/612  
Offering Faculty: School of Business  
COMM 221  Introduction To Finance  Units: 3.00  

The focus is on financial decisions of the firm and the consumer. The two main tasks of financial management, investment choices and financing choices, are examined with emphasis on separation of the investment decision and the owners' consumption decisions, on net present value in capital budgeting, and on capital structure. The course examines choices of portfolios by consumers and how these choices lead to equilibrium opportunity rates.

Requirements: This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 2nd yr or greater of their program, excludes Commerce/CIB EXCLUSIONS: No more than one course from COMM 221 or COMM 621 or EMPR 280 No more than 6.0 units from any COMM 200-level course.  
Course Equivalencies: COMM121/221/621  
Offering Faculty: School of Business  
COMM 231  Fundamentals of Marketing  Units: 3.00  

This course provides students with a knowledge of the concepts of marketing as well as an understanding of how these concepts are applied in the management of the firm. Specifically, the objectives are: to provide a working knowledge of the basic theories and concepts in marketing; to develop decision making skills and abilities and to gain experience in developing marketing strategies and plans. The course is taught using a combination of lectures, discussions, case analyses, student presentations, and exams.

Requirements: This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 2nd yr or greater of their program, excludes Commerce/CIB. EXCLUSIONS: No more than one course from COMM 231 or COMM 631 No more than 6.0 units from any COMM 200-level course.  
Course Equivalencies: COMM131/231/631  
Offering Faculty: School of Business  
COMM 251  Organizational Behaviour  Units: 3.00  

This course introduces students to the study of human behaviour in organizations. The purpose is to provide a coherent account of the causes and consequences of organizational behaviour. Lectures, discussions, cases and exercises will be used to broaden the students' understanding of working environments. Whenever possible, students' own employment experiences will be drawn upon as a basis for understanding the concepts discussed.

Requirements: This course is restricted to students enrolled in the 2nd yr or greater of their program, excludes Commerce/CIB. EXCLUSIONS: No more than one course from COMM 251 or COMM 651 or EMPR 270 No more than 6.0 units from any COMM 200-level course.  
Course Equivalencies: COMM151/251/651  
Offering Faculty: School of Business